„Science is nothing else than the search to discover unity in the wild variety of nature — or more exactly, in the variety of our experience.“

—  Jacob Bronowski, Context: The progress of science is the discovery at each step of a new order which gives unity to what had long seemed unlike. Faraday did this when he closed the link between electricity and magnetism. Clerk Maxwell did it when he linked both with light. Einstein linked time with space, mass with energy, and the path of light past the sun with the flight of a bullet; and spent his dying years in trying to add to these likenesses another, which would find a single imaginative order between the equations between Clerk Maxwell and his own geometry of gravitation When Coleridge tried to define beauty, he returned always to one deep thought: beauty he said, is "unity in variety." Science is nothing else than the search to discover unity in the wild variety of nature — or more exactly, in the variety of our experience. As quoted in The God Particle (1993) by Leon Lederman – ISBN 978–0–618–71168–0
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Jacob Bronowski3
1908 - 1974
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„Nothing is more natural than to marry.“

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„England, with her climate of more than vernal freshness, and in whose summer skies, and rich autumnal clouds, the observer of Nature may daily watch her endless varieties of effect.... to one brief moment caught [by the artist] from fleeting time..“

—  John Constable English Romantic painter 1776 - 1837
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„All of science is nothing more than the refinement of everyday thinking.“

—  Albert Einstein German-born physicist and founder of the theory of relativity 1879 - 1955
1930s, "Physics and Reality" in the Journal of the Franklin Institute Vol. 221, Issue 3 (March 1936) Variant translation: "The whole of science is nothing more than a refinement of everyday thinking." As it appears in the "Physics and Reality" section of the book "Out of My Later Years" by Albert Einstein (1950)

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„An experiment is a question which science poses to Nature and a measurement is the recording of Nature's answer.“

—  Max Planck, Scientific Autobiography and Other Papers
Context: Experimenters are the schocktroops of science… An experiment is a question which science poses to Nature, and a measurement is the recording of Nature’s answer. But before an experiment can be performed, it must be planned – the question to nature must be formulated before being posed. Before the result of a measurement can be used, it must be interpreted – Nature’s answer must be understood properly. These two tasks are those of theorists, who find himself always more and more dependent on the tools of abstract mathematics. Scientific Autobiography and Other Papers (1949)

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„All the knowledge we have of nature depends upon facts; for without observations and experiments our natural philosophy would only be a science of terms and an unintelligible jargon.“

—  John Theophilus Desaguliers French-born British natural philosopher and clergyman 1683 - 1744
Course of Experimental Philosophy, 1745, Context: All the knowledge we have of nature depends upon facts; for without observations and experiments our natural philosophy would only be a science of terms and an unintelligible jargon. But then we must call in Geometry and Arithmetics, to our Assistance, unless we are willing to content ourselves with natural History and conjectural Philosophy. For, as many causes concur in the production of compound effects, we are liable to mistake the predominant cause, unless we can measure the quantity and the effect produced, compare them with, and distinguish them from, each other, to find out the adequate cause of each single effect, and what must be the result of their joint action. p. v: Preface

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