„What men want is not talent, it is purpose,—in other words, not the power to achieve, but the will to labour.“

Lucretia, Part II, Chapter XII
Contexto: The most useless creature that ever yawned at a club, or counted the vermin on his rags under the suns of Calabria, has no excuse for want of intellect. What men want is not talent, it is purpose,—in other words, not the power to achieve, but the will to labour.

Obtido da Wikiquote. Última atualização 22 de Maio de 2020. História
Edward Bulwer-Lytton photo
Edward Bulwer-Lytton15
1803 - 1873

Citações relacionadas

Citát „Men don't need linguistic talent; they just need courage and words.“
Helen Fisher photo

„Men don't need linguistic talent; they just need courage and words.“

—  Helen Fisher Canadian anthropologist 1947

Fonte: Why We Love: The Nature and Chemistry of Romantic Love

Clive Staples Lewis photo
Hugo Black photo
Thomas Brooks photo
John Buchan photo

„All that is needed is direction, which could be given by men of far lower gifts than a Bonaparte. In a word, you want a Power-House, and then the age of miracles will begin“

—  John Buchan, livro The Power-House

Fonte: The Power-House (1916), Ch. 3 "Tells of a Midsummer Night"
Contexto: "It would scarcely be destruction," he replied gently. "Let us call it iconoclasm, the swallowing of formulas, which has always had its full retinue of idealists. And you do not want a Napoleon. All that is needed is direction, which could be given by men of far lower gifts than a Bonaparte. In a word, you want a Power-House, and then the age of miracles will begin."

Saul Bellow photo

„Goodness is achieved not in a vacuum, but in the company of other men, attended by love.“

—  Saul Bellow, livro Dangling Man

Dangling Man (1944) [Penguin Classics, 1996, ISBN 0-140-18935-1], p. 84
General sources

Eric Hoffer photo
William Golding photo

„Words may, through the devotion, the skill, the passion, and the luck of writers prove to be the most powerful thing in the world. They may move men to speak to each other because some of those words somewhere express not just what the writer is thinking but what a huge segment of the world is thinking.“

—  William Golding British novelist, poet, playwright and Nobel Prize for Literature laureate 1911 - 1993

Nobel prize lecture (1983)
Contexto: Words may, through the devotion, the skill, the passion, and the luck of writers prove to be the most powerful thing in the world. They may move men to speak to each other because some of those words somewhere express not just what the writer is thinking but what a huge segment of the world is thinking. They may allow man to speak to man, the man in the street to speak to his fellow until a ripple becomes a tide running through every nation — of commonsense, of simple healthy caution, a tide that rulers and negotiators cannot ignore so that nation does truly speak unto nation. Then there is hope that we may learn to be temperate, provident, taking no more from nature's treasury than is our due. It may be by books, stories, poetry, lectures we who have the ear of mankind can move man a little nearer the perilous safety of a warless and provident world. It cannot be done by the mechanical constructs of overt propaganda. I cannot do it myself, cannot now create stories which would help to make man aware of what he is doing; but there are others who can, many others. There always have been. We need more humanity, more care, more love. There are those who expect a political system to produce that; and others who expect the love to produce the system. My own faith is that the truth of the future lies between the two and we shall behave humanly and a bit humanely, stumbling along, haphazardly generous and gallant, foolishly and meanly wise until the rape of our planet is seen to be the preposterous folly that it is.
For we are a marvel of creation. I think in particular of one of the most extraordinary women, dead now these five hundred years, Juliana of Norwich. She was caught up in the spirit and shown a thing that might lie in the palm of her hand and in the bigness of a nut. She was told it was the world. She was told of the strange and wonderful and awful things that would happen there. At the last, a voice told her that all things should be well and all manner of things should be well and all things should be very well.
Now we, if not in the spirit, have been caught up to see our earth, our mother, Gaia Mater, set like a jewel in space. We have no excuse now for supposing her riches inexhaustible nor the area we have to live on limitless because unbounded. We are the children of that great blue white jewel. Through our mother we are part of the solar system and part through that of the whole universe. In the blazing poetry of the fact we are children of the stars.

Ernest Bevin photo

„We need 720,000 men continuously employed in this industry. This is where you boys come in. Our fighting men will not be able to achieve their purpose unless we get an adequate supply of coal.“

—  Ernest Bevin British labour leader, politician, and statesman 1881 - 1951

Hansard HC 6ser vol 449 col 841 http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200506/cmhansrd/cm060725/debtext/60725-1076.htm
Speech to recruiting meeting, December 1943. Bevin had introduced a system whereby some men conscripted for National Service would be transferred to working in coal-mining; because of this speech, they were known as 'Bevin boys'.

John Updike photo

„Facts are generally overesteemed. For most practical purposes, a thing is what men think it is.“

—  John Updike American novelist, poet, short story writer, art critic, and literary critic 1932 - 2009

Act I
Buchanan Dying (1974)
Contexto: Facts are generally overesteemed. For most practical purposes, a thing is what men think it is. When they judged the earth flat, it was flat. As long as men thought slavery tolerable, tolerable it was. We live down here among shadows, shadows among shadows.

„What women want is what men want. They want respect.“

—  Marilyn vos Savant US American magazine columnist, author and lecturer 1946

As quoted in Evergreen : A Guide to Writing with Readings (2003), by Susan Fawcett

Citát „The imagination is not a talent of some men but is the health of every man.“
Ralph Waldo Emerson photo

„The imagination is not a talent of some men but is the health of every man.“

—  Ralph Waldo Emerson American philosopher, essayist, and poet 1803 - 1882

Poetry and Imagination
1870s, Society and Solitude (1870), Books, Letters and Social Aims http://www.rwe.org/comm/index.php?option=com_content&task=category&sectionid=5&id=74&Itemid=149 (1876)

William Hazlitt photo
Barack Obama photo

„Men don't respond to words. What they respond to is "no contact".“

—  Sherry Argov American writer 1977

Fonte: Why Men Love Bitches: From Doormat to Dreamgirl—A Woman's Guide to Holding Her Own in a Relationship

Leo Tolstoy photo
Anthony Trollope photo

„What men ought to want is liberty.“

—  Anthony Trollope, livro The Duke's Children

Fonte: The Duke's Children (1879), Ch. 48
Contexto: "I think it is so glorious," said the American. "There is no such mischievous nonsense in all the world as equality. That is what father says. What men ought to want is liberty."

Tópicos relacionados