„There rise authors now and then, who seem proof against the mutability of language, because they have rooted themselves in the unchanging principles of human nature.“

—  Washington Irving, livro The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent.

"The Mutabilities of Literature".
The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon (1819–1820)
Contexto: There rise authors now and then, who seem proof against the mutability of language, because they have rooted themselves in the unchanging principles of human nature. They are like gigantic trees that we sometimes see on the banks of a stream; which, by their vast and deep roots, penetrating through the mere surface, and laying hold on the very foundations of the earth, preserve the soil around them from being swept away by the ever-flowing current, and hold up many a neighboring plant, and perhaps worthless weed, to perpetuity.

Última atualização 22 de Maio de 2020. História
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Washington Irving11
1783 - 1859
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Joseph Addison photo

„Mutability of temper and inconsistency with ourselves is the greatest weakness of human nature.“

—  Joseph Addison politician, writer and playwright 1672 - 1719

No. 162 (5 September 1711).
The Spectator (1711–1714)

Henry George photo

„Stepping out of their proper sphere and arrogating to themselves an authority to which they have no claim, professed teachers of spiritual truths long presumed to deny the truths of the natural sciences. But now professed teachers of the natural sciences, stepping in turn out of their proper sphere and arrogating to themselves an authority to which they have no claim, presume to deny spiritual truths.“

—  Henry George American economist 1839 - 1897

Conclusion : The Moral of this Examination
A Perplexed Philosopher (1892)
Contexto: Stepping out of their proper sphere and arrogating to themselves an authority to which they have no claim, professed teachers of spiritual truths long presumed to deny the truths of the natural sciences. But now professed teachers of the natural sciences, stepping in turn out of their proper sphere and arrogating to themselves an authority to which they have no claim, presume to deny spiritual truths. And there are many, who having discarded an authority often perverted by the influence of dominant wrong, have in its place accepted another authority which in its blank materialism affords as efficient a means for stilling conscience and defending selfish greed as any perversion of religious truth.
Mr. Spencer is the foremost representative of this authority. Widely regarded as the scientific philosopher; eulogized by his admirers as the greatest of all philosophers — as the man who has cleared and illuminated the field of philosophy by bringing into it the exact methods of science — he carries to the common mind the weight of the marvelous scientific achievements of our time as applied to the most momentous of problems. The effect is to impress it with a vague belief that modern science has proved the idea of God to be an ignorant superstition and the hope of a future life a vain delusion.

Ralph Waldo Emerson photo

„Nature is a mutable cloud which is always and never the same.“

—  Ralph Waldo Emerson American philosopher, essayist, and poet 1803 - 1882

History
Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919), Essays, First Series
Variante: Nature is a mutable cloud which is always and never the same.

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John Tyndall photo

„To legislation… the Puritans resorted. Instead of guiding, they repressed, and thus pitted themselves against the unconquerable impulses of human nature. Believing that nature to be depraved, they felt themselves logically warranted in putting it in irons. But they failed; and their failure ought to be a warning to their successors.“

—  John Tyndall British scientist 1820 - 1893

New Fragments (1892)
Contexto: To legislation... the Puritans resorted. Instead of guiding, they repressed, and thus pitted themselves against the unconquerable impulses of human nature. Believing that nature to be depraved, they felt themselves logically warranted in putting it in irons. But they failed; and their failure ought to be a warning to their successors.<!--p.34

Bertrand Russell photo

„If human nature were unchangeable, as ignorant people still suppose it to be, the situation would indeed be hopeless.“

—  Bertrand Russell logician, one of the first analytic philosophers and political activist 1872 - 1970

Fonte: 1920s, Sceptical Essays (1928), Ch. 17: Some Prospects: Cheerful and Otherwise

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Baruch Spinoza photo

„Nature offers nothing that can be called this man's rather than another's ; but, under nature, everything belongs to all — that is, they have authority to claim it for themselves.“

—  Baruch Spinoza Dutch philosopher 1632 - 1677

Fonte: Political Treatise (1677), Ch. 2, Of Natural Right
Contexto: Nature offers nothing that can be called this man's rather than another's; but, under nature, everything belongs to all — that is, they have authority to claim it for themselves. But, under dominion, where it is by common law determined what belongs to this man, and what to that, he is called just who has a constant will to render to every man his own, but he, unjust who strives, on the contrary, to make his own that which belongs to another.

Hans Morgenthau photo

„Political realism believes that politics, like society in general, is governed by objective laws that have their roots in human nature.“

—  Hans Morgenthau, livro Politics Among Nations

Six Principles of Political Realism http://www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/intrel/morg6.htm, § 1.
Politics Among Nations (1948)
Contexto: Political realism believes that politics, like society in general, is governed by objective laws that have their roots in human nature. In order to improve society it is first necessary to understand the laws by which society lives. The operation of these laws being impervious to our preferences, men will challenge them only at the risk of failure.
Realism, believing as it does in the objectivity of the laws of politics, must also believe in the possibility of developing a rational theory that reflects, however imperfectly and one-sidedly, these objective laws. It believes also, then, in the possibility of distinguishing in politics between truth and opinion — between what is true objectively and rationally, supported by evidence and illuminated by reason, and what is only a subjective judgment, divorced from the facts as they are and informed by prejudice and wishful thinking.

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„The text is really a comment on the limited nature of human language. Such language must by nature be diverse in its attempts to describe that which is One and finally indescribable.“

—  Anantanand Rambachan Hindu studies scholar 1951

Fonte: The Nature and Authority of Scripture (1995), p. 20
Contexto: The famous Rgveda text, "One is the Truth, the sages speak of it differently" (1.64.46), is often employed to explain away doctrinal differences as merely semantic ones. The point of this text, as its context makes quite clear, is not really to dismiss the significance of the different ways in which we speak of the One or to see these ways as equally valid. The text is really a comment on the limited nature of human language. Such language must by nature be diverse in its attempts to describe that which is One and finally indescribable. The text, however, is widely cited in ways that seem to make interreligious dialogue redundant.

Randal Marlin photo

„The specific media my change, but the principles of human nature have remained fairly constant over the millenia.“

—  Randal Marlin Canadian academic 1938

Fonte: Propaganda & The Ethics Of Persuasion (2002), Chapter One, Why Study Propaganda?, p. 15

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