„To Leonora's eternal question he answered that all he desired in life was that — that he could pick himself together again and go on with his daily occupations if — the girl, being five thousand miles away, would continue to love him.“

—  Ford Madox Ford, livro The Good Soldier

Part Four, Ch. V (pp. 240-241)
The Good Soldier (1915)
Contexto: She asked him perpetually what he wanted. What did he want? What did he want? And all he ever answered was: "I have told you". He meant that he wanted the girl to go to her father in India as soon as her father should cable that he was ready to receive her. But just once he tripped up. To Leonora's eternal question he answered that all he desired in life was that — that he could pick himself together again and go on with his daily occupations if — the girl, being five thousand miles away, would continue to love him. He wanted nothing more, He prayed his God for nothing more. Well, he was a sentimentalist.

Última atualização 22 de Maio de 2020. História
Ford Madox Ford photo
Ford Madox Ford
1873 - 1939

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