„The modern man is conscious of everything, and cannot find a remedy against anything.“

—  Henryk Sienkiewicz, Context: Formerly character proved a strong curb for passions; in the present there is not much strength in character, and it grows less and less because of the prevailing scepticism, which is a decomposing element. It is like a bacillus breeding in the human soul; it destroys the resistant power against the physiological craving of the nerves, of nerves diseased. The modern man is conscious of everything, and cannot find a remedy against anything. 10 November
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Henryk Sienkiewicz3
1846 - 1916
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