„Always when you are about to say anything, first weigh it in your mind; for with many the tongue outruns the thought.“

—  Isócrates, Context: Always when you are about to say anything, first weigh it in your mind; for with many the tongue outruns the thought. Let there be but two occasions for speech — when the subject is one which you thoroughly know and when it one on which you are compelled to speak. On these occasions alone is speech better than silence; on all others, it is better to be silent than to speak. Verse 41.
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Isócrates
-436 - -338 a.C.
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