„Banditry is freedom, but in a peasant society few can be free. most are shackled by double chains of lordship and labour, one reinforcing the other.“

—  Eric Hobsbawm, Bandits (1969), Context: Banditry is freedom, but in a peasant society few can be free. most are shackled by double chains of lordship and labour, one reinforcing the other. For what makes peasants the victim of authority is not as much their economic vulnerability - indeed they are as often as not virtually self sufficient - as their mobility. Chapter Two
Eric Hobsbawm photo
Eric Hobsbawm7
1917 - 2012
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John Dewey photo

„To free one's mind of chains is to free it of the care of what is acceptable or viewed so by society, this is when true freedom is discovered.“

—  John Dewey American philosopher, psychologist, and educational reformer 1859 - 1952
Misattributed, This text is commentary (not a quotation of Dewey) that was added to this page at [//en.wikiquote.org/w/index.php?title=John_Dewey&diff=prev&oldid=896209 05:36, 2 February 2009 (UTC)]; the text was later removed from this page but not before being misattributed to Dewey on several web sites, including in a sermon given at an Episcopal church https://web.archive.org/web/20160304201732/http://www.trinitywhitinsville.org/sermons/theprudenceofgenerosity.html. The statement was commenting on a quotation from Democracy and Education (1916): "The first step in freeing men from external chains was to emancipate them from the internal chains of false beliefs and ideals."

Nelson Mandela photo

„For to be free is not merely to cast off one's chains, but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others.“

—  Nelson Mandela President of South Africa, anti-apartheid activist 1918 - 2013
1990s, Long Walk to Freedom (1995), Context: It was during those long and lonely years that my hunger for the freedom of my own people became a hunger for the freedom of all people, white and black. I knew as well as I knew anything that the oppressor must be liberated just as surely as the oppressed. A man who takes away another man's freedom is a prisoner of hatred, he is locked behind the bars of prejudice and narrow-mindedness. I am not truly free if I am taking away someone else's freedom, just as surely as I am not free when my freedom is taken from me. The oppressed and the oppressor alike are robbed of their humanity. When I walked out of prison, that was my mission, to liberate the oppressed and the oppressor both. Some say that has now been achieved. But I know that that is not the case. The truth is that we are not yet free; we have merely achieved the freedom to be free, the right not to be oppressed. We have not taken the final step of our journey, but the first step on a longer and even more difficult road. For to be free is not merely to cast off one's chains, but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others. The true test of our devotion to freedom is just beginning.

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Felix Frankfurter photo

„Without a free press there can be no free society. That is axiomatic. However, freedom of the press is not an end in itself but a means to the end of a free society.“

—  Felix Frankfurter American judge 1882 - 1965
Judicial opinions, The scope and nature of the constitutional guarantee of the freedom of the press are to be viewed and applied in that light. New York Times (November 28, 1954).

Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar photo
Felix Frankfurter photo
Victor Hugo photo
Edward Gibbon photo

„In the end, more than freedom, they wanted security. They wanted a comfortable life, and they lost it all – security, comfort, and freedom. When the Athenians finally wanted not to give to society but for society to give to them, when the freedom they wished for most was freedom from responsibility, then Athens ceased to be free and was never free again.“

—  Edward Gibbon English historian and Member of Parliament 1737 - 1794
Misattributed, This quotation appeared in an article by Margaret Thatcher, "The Moral Foundations of Society" ( Imprimis, March 1995 https://imprimis.hillsdale.edu/the-moral-foundations-of-society/), which was an edited version of a lecture Thatcher had given at Hillsdale College in November 1994. Here is the actual passage from Thatcher's article: <blockquote>[M]ore than they wanted freedom, the Athenians wanted security. Yet they lost everything—security, comfort, and freedom. This was because they wanted not to give to society, but for society to give to them. The freedom they were seeking was freedom from responsibility. It is no wonder, then, that they ceased to be free. In the modern world, we should recall the Athenians' dire fate whenever we confront demands for increased state paternalism.</blockquote> The italicized passage above originated with Thatcher. In characterizing the Athenians in the article she cited Sir Edward Gibbon, but she seems to have been paraphrasing statements in "Athens' Failure," a chapter of classicist Edith Hamilton's book The Echo of Greece (1957), pp. 47–48 http://www.ergo-sum.net/books/Hamilton_EchoOfGreece_pp.47-48.jpg).

Halldór Laxness photo

„They who clamor loudest for freedom are often the ones least likely to be happy in a free society.“

—  Eric Hoffer, book The True Believer
The True Believer (1951), Part Two: The Potential Converts, Context: Those who see their lives as spoiled and wasted crave equality and fraternity more than they do freedom. If they clamor for freedom, it is but freedom to establish equality and uniformity. The passion for equality is partly a passion for anonymity: to be one thread of the many which make up a tunic; one thread not distinguishable from the others. No one can then point us out, measure us against others and expose our inferiority. They who clamor loudest for freedom are often the ones least likely to be happy in a free society. The frustrated, oppressed by their shortcomings, blame their failure on existing restraints. Actually, their innermost desire is for an end to the "free for all." They want to eliminate free competition and the ruthless testing to which the individual is continually subjected in a free society. Section 28

Isaiah Berlin photo

„The fundamental sense of freedom is freedom from chains, from imprisonment, from enslavement by others. The rest is extension of this sense, or else metaphor.“

—  Isaiah Berlin Russo-British Jewish social and political theorist, philosopher and historian of ideas 1909 - 1997
Five Essays on Liberty (2002), Introduction (1969)

John F. Kennedy photo

„With your help, and the help of other free men, this crisis can be surmounted. Freedom can prevail and peace can endure.“

—  John F. Kennedy 35th president of the United States of America 1917 - 1963
1961, Berlin Crisis speech, Context: The steps I have indicated tonight are aimed at avoiding that war. To sum it all up: we seek peace — but we shall not surrender. That is the central meaning of this crisis, and the meaning of your government's policy. With your help, and the help of other free men, this crisis can be surmounted. Freedom can prevail and peace can endure.

Clarence Darrow photo

„You can only protect your liberties in this world by protecting the other man's freedom. You can only be free if I am free.“

—  Clarence Darrow American lawyer and leading member of the American Civil Liberties Union 1857 - 1938
Address to the court in People v. Lloyd (1920)

Salman Rushdie photo
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Tony Benn photo

„Choice depends on the freedom to choose and if you are shackled with debt you don’t have the freedom to choose.“

—  Tony Benn British Labour Party politician 1925 - 2014
2000s, Interview with Michael Moore in the movie Sicko (2007).

Patrick Buchanan photo

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“