„Liberty and conscience thus became a sacred part of human nature. Freedom not only to think, but to speak and act is a God-given privilege.“

Improvement Era (October 1958) pp 718-719
Contexto: Next to life we express gratitude for the gift of free agency. When thou didst create man, thou placed within him part of thine omnipotence and bade him choose for himself. Liberty and conscience thus became a sacred part of human nature. Freedom not only to think, but to speak and act is a God-given privilege.

Última atualização 22 de Maio de 2020. História
David O. McKay photo
David O. McKay2
1873 - 1970

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