„In this regard too I consider myself a cripple, a stunted man whose fate it is to admit honestly that he must put up with this state of affairs (so as not to fall for some romantic swindle)… For you a theologian of liberal persuasion (whether Catholic or Protestant) is necessarily most abhorrent as the typical representative of a halfway position;“

—  Max Weber, Context: When I studied modern Catholic literature in Rome a few years ago, I became convinced how hopeless is to think that there are any scientific results this church cannot digest... I could not honestly participate in such anti-clericalism. It is true that I am absolutely unmusical in matters religious and that I have neither the need nor the ability to erect any religious edifices within me — that is simply impossible for me, and I reject it. But after examining myself carefully I must say that I am neither anti-religious nor irreligious. In this regard too I consider myself a cripple, a stunted man whose fate it is to admit honestly that he must put up with this state of affairs (so as not to fall for some romantic swindle)... For you a theologian of liberal persuasion (whether Catholic or Protestant) is necessarily most abhorrent as the typical representative of a halfway position; for me he is in human terms infinitely more valuable and interesting... than the intellectual (and basically cheap) pharisaism of naturalism, which is intolerably fashionable and in which there is much less life than in the religious position (again, depending on the case, of course!) Max Weber, letter to Ferdinand Tönnies, Feb. 19, 1909; As cited in: . Uncertain Victory: Social Democracy and Progressivism in European and American Thought, 1870-1920. Oxford University Press, 24 mrt. 1988. p. 498
Max Weber photo
Max Weber13
1864 - 1920
Publicidade

Citações relacionadas

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow photo

„Thy fate is the common fate of all;
Into each life some rain must fall,
Some days must be dark and dreary.“

—  Henry Wadsworth Longfellow American poet 1807 - 1882
"The Rainy Day", Bentley's Miscellany ( December 1841 http://books.google.com/books?id=pW8AAAAAYAAJ&q=%22Thy+fate+is+the+common+fate+of+all+Into+each+life+some+rain+must+fall+some+days+must+be+dark+and+dreary%22&pg=PA626#v=onepage).

Adolf Eichmann photo
Publicidade
Georgette Heyer photo
Joni Mitchell photo
Robert Burns photo
James Graham, 1st Marquess of Montrose photo

„He either fears his fate too much,
Or his deserts are small,
That dares not put it to the touch
To gain or lose it all.“

—  James Graham, 1st Marquess of Montrose Scottish nobleman, poet and soldier of the Wars of the Three Kingdoms 1612 - 1650
My Dear and only Love. Compare: "That puts it not unto the touch/ To win or lose it all", Sir W. F. P. Napier, Montrose and the Covenanters, vol. ii. p. 566.

 Aeschylus photo

„Ah state of mortal man! in time of weal,
A line, a shadow! and if ill fate fall,
One wet sponge-sweep wipes all our trace away.“

—  Aeschylus ancient Athenian playwright -525 - -456 a.C.
Oresteia (458 BC), Agamemnon, Ἰὼ βρότεια πράγματ'· εὐτυχοῦντα μὲν σκιᾷ τις ἂν πρέψειεν· εἰ δὲ δυστυχοῖ, βολαῖς ὑγρώσσων σπόγγος ὤλεσεν γραφήν. lines 1327–1329 (tr. E. D. A. Morshead)

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow photo

„The face is its own fate — a man does what he must —
And the body underneath it says: I am.“

—  Randall Jarrell poet, critic, novelist, essayist 1914 - 1965
The Seven-League Crutches (1951), Context: Death and the devil, what are these to him? His being accuses him — and yet his face is firm In resolution, in absolute persistence; The folds of smiling do for steadiness; The face is its own fate — a man does what he must — And the body underneath it says: I am. "The Knight, Death and the Devil," lines 34-39

Emily Dickinson photo
G. K. Chesterton photo
Gautama Buddha photo

„I do not believe in a fate that falls on men however they act; but I do believe in a fate that falls on them unless they act.“

—  Gautama Buddha philosopher, reformer and the founder of Buddhism -566 - -483 a.C.
Misattributed, G. K. Chesterton, in "On Holland" in Illustrated London News (29 April 1922)

Alexander Pope photo

„A brave man struggling in the storms of fate,
And greatly falling with a falling state.
While Cato gives his little senate laws,
What bosom beats not in his country's cause?“

—  Alexander Pope eighteenth century English poet 1688 - 1744
Prologue to Mr. Addison's Cato (1713), Line 21. Pope also uses the reference, "Like Cato, give his little Senate laws", in his Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot (1734), Prologue to Imitations of Horace.

Ayn Rand photo
John Ogilby photo

„May you live happy, you whose Woes are done.
Stern Fates, to Fates more cruel, us constrain.“

—  John Ogilby Scottish academic 1600 - 1676
The Works of Publius Virgilius Maro (2nd ed. 1654), Virgil's Æneis

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“