„Law is king of all.“

—  Henry Alford, School of the Heart (1835), Lesson 6; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 430.
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Henry Alford
1810 - 1871
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„Law, the king of all mortals and immortals.“

—  Pindar Ancient Greek poet -522 - -446 a.C.
As quoted in Plato's Gorgias, 484b.

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„Who to himself is law no law doth need,
Offends no law, and is a king indeed.“

—  George Chapman English dramatist, poet, and translator 1559 - 1634
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„Such subjects are the very strength of kings,
And are thus above the law.“

—  Pierre Corneille French tragedian 1606 - 1684
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„Laws of justice which Hammurabi, the wise king, established.“

—  Hammurabi sixth king of Babylon -1810 - -1750 a.C.
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„The King himself should be under no man, but under God and the Law.“

—  Edward Coke English lawyer and judge 1552 - 1634
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„By its eyes it was a Seer; and by its mouth speaking great things and changing times and laws, it was a Prophet as well as a King. And such a Seer, a Prophet and a King, is the Church of Rome. A Seer“

—  Isaac Newton British physicist and mathematician and founder of modern classical physics 1643 - 1727
Context: Now Daniel, considered the horns, and behold there came up among them another horn, before whom there were three of the first horns plucked up by the roots; and behold in this horn were eyes like the eyes of a man, and a mouth speaking great things,—and his look was more stout than his fellows,—and the same horn made war with the saints, and prevailed against them... and speak great words against the most High, and wear out the saints, and think to change times and laws... By its eyes it was a Seer; and by its mouth speaking great things and changing times and laws, it was a Prophet as well as a King. And such a Seer, a Prophet and a King, is the Church of Rome. A Seer, Επισκοπος, is a Bishop in the literal sense of the word; and this Church claims the universal Bishopric. With his mouth he gives laws to kings and nations as an Oracle; and pretends to Infallibility, and that his dictates are binding to the whole world; which is to be a Prophet in the highest degree. Vol. I, Ch. 7: Of the Eleventh Horn of Daniel's Fourth Beast

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„He that to nought aspires, doth nothing need;
Who breaks no law is subject to no king.“

—  George Chapman English dramatist, poet, and translator 1559 - 1634
The Revenge of Bussy D'Ambois (1613), Act IV, scene i.

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„Remember that all the King’s horses and all the King’s men couldn’t put Humpty-Dumpty together again. There’s such a tremendous truth in that.“

—  P. L. Travers Australian-British novelist, actress and journalist 1899 - 1996
Context: She doesn’t hold back anything from them. When they beg her not to depart, she reminds them that nothing lasts forever. She’s as truthful as the nursery rhymes. Remember that all the King’s horses and all the King’s men couldn’t put Humpty-Dumpty together again. There’s such a tremendous truth in that. It goes into children in some part of them that they don’t know, and indeed perhaps we don’t know. But eventually they realize — and that’s the great truth.

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„The King governs by Law. Let us look back to the evils we had, in order to prevent more.“

—  Edmund Waller English poet and politician 1606 - 1687
Context: The King governs by Law. Let us look back to the evils we had, in order to prevent more. There was loan, and ship-money, and extremes begat extremes. The House would then give no money. Let the King rely upon the Parliament; we have settled the Crown and the Government. 'Tis strange that we have sat so many years, and given so much money, and are still called upon for Supply. The Lords may give Supply with their own money, but we give the peoples; we are their proxies. The King takes his measures by the Parliament, and he doubts not but that all the Commons will supply for the Government; but giving at this rate that we have done, we shall be "a branch of the revenue." They will "anticipate" us too. But, let the officers say what they will, we will not make these mismanagements the King's error. 'Tis better it should fall upon us than the King. We give public money, and must see that it goes to public use. Tell your money, fix it to public ends, and take order against occasions of this nature for the future. We cannot live at the expence of Spain, that has the Indies; or France, who has so many millions of revenue. Let us look to our Government, Fleet, and Trade. 'Tis the advice that the oldest Parliament-man among you can give you; and so, God bless you! Speech in parliament (19 October 1675) http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?compid=40374.

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