„The basic objectives and principles of war do not change.
The final objective in war is the destruction of the enemy's capacity and will to fight, and thereby force him to accept the imposition of the victor's will.“

—  Chester Nimitz, Context: The basic objectives and principles of war do not change. The final objective in war is the destruction of the enemy's capacity and will to fight, and thereby force him to accept the imposition of the victor's will. This submission has been accomplished in the past by pressure in and from each of the elements of land and sea, and during World War I and II, in and from the air as well. The optimum of pressure is exerted through that absolute control obtained by actual physical occupation. This optimum is obtainable only on land where physical occupation can be consolidated and maintained.
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Chester Nimitz
1885 - 1966
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—  Sun Tzu ancient Chinese military general, strategist and philosopher from the Zhou Dynasty -543 - 251 a.C.
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„Wars are fought to gain a certain objective.“

—  Jawaharlal Nehru Indian lawyer, statesman, and writer, first Prime Minister of India 1889 - 1964
Context: Wars are fought to gain a certain objective. War itself is not the objective; victory is not the objective; you fight to remove the obstruction that comes in the way of your objective. If you let victory become the end in itself then you've gone astray and forgotten what you were originally fighting about. Interview by James Cameron, in Picture Post (28 October 1950)

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—  Madeleine K. Albright Former U.S. Secretary of State 1937
Speech at a Harvard Institute of Politics/Harvard Divinity School forum (April 11, 2007), quoted in the Harvard Crimson http://www.thecrimson.com/article/2007/4/12/albright-calls-for-diplomacy-in-iraq/

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„The war we are fighting until victory or the bitter end is in its deepest sense a war between Christ and Marx.
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—  Joseph Goebbels Nazi politician and Propaganda Minister 1897 - 1945
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