„Ignorance breeds monsters to fill up all the vacuities of the soul that are unoccupied by the verities of knowledge.“

—  Horace Mann, Congressional speech (1849), Context: I affirm, in words as true and literal as any that belong to geometry, that the man who withholds knowledge from a child not only works diabolical miracles for the destruction of good, but for the creation of evil also. He who shuts out truth, by the same act opens the door to all the error that supplies its place. Ignorance breeds monsters to fill up all the vacuities of the soul that are unoccupied by the verities of knowledge. He who dethrones the idea of law, bids chaos welcome in its stead. Superstition is the mathematical complement of religious truth; and just so much less as the life of a human being is reclaimed to good, just so much more is it delivered over to evil. The man or the institution, therefore, that withholds knowledge from a child, or from a race of children, exercises the awful power of changing the world in which they are to live, just as much as though he should annihilate all that is most lovely and grand in this planet of ours, or transport the victim of his cruelty to some dark and frigid zone of the universe, where the sweets of knowledge are unknown, and the terrors of ignorance hold their undisputed and remorseless reign.
Horace Mann photo
Horace Mann5
1796 - 1859

Citações relacionadas

Alfred North Whitehead photo
Albert Schweitzer photo
George Eliot photo
Edward Everett photo

„The great object of all knowledge is to enlarge and purify the soul“

—  Edward Everett American politician, orator, statesman 1794 - 1865
Context: The great object of all knowledge is to enlarge and purify the soul, to fill the mind with noble contemplations, to furnish a refined pleasure, and to lead our feeble reason from the works of nature up to its great Author and Sustainer. Considering this as the ultimate end of science, no branch of it can surely claim precedence of Astronomy. No other science furnishes such a palpable embodiment of the abstractions which lie at the foundation of our intellectual system; the great ideas of time, and space, and extension, and magnitude, and number, and motion, and power. How grand the conception of the ages on ages required for several of the secular equations of the solar system; of distances from which the light of a fixed star would not reach us in twenty millions of years, of magnitudes compared with which the earth is but a foot-ball; of starry hosts—suns like our own—numberless as the sands on the shore; of worlds and systems shooting through the infinite spaces "The Uses of Astronomy" (28 July 1856) http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/16227.

Daniel J. Boorstin photo
Stephen Hawking photo

„The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance. It is the illusion of knowledge.“

—  Stephen Hawking British theoretical physicist, cosmologist, and author 1942 - 2018
Misattributed, Sometimes attributed to Hawking without a source, but originally from historian Daniel J. Boorstin. It appears in different forms in The Discoverers (1983), Cleopatra's Nose (1995), and introduction to The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (1995)

Giordano Bruno photo

„The single spirit doth simultaneously temper the whole together; this is the single soul of all things; all are filled with God.“

—  Giordano Bruno Italian philosopher, mathematician and astronomer 1548 - 1600
De immenso (1591), IV 9; as translated by Dorothea Waley Singer (1950)

Joseph Joubert photo

„Few minds are spacious; few even have an empty place in them or can offer some vacant point. Almost all have narrow capacities and are filled by some knowledge that blocks them up.“

—  Joseph Joubert French moralist and essayist 1754 - 1824
Context: Few minds are spacious; few even have an empty place in them or can offer some vacant point. Almost all have narrow capacities and are filled by some knowledge that blocks them up. What a torture to talk to filled heads, that allow nothing from the outside to enter them! A good mind, in order to enjoy itself and allow itself to enjoy others, always keeps itself larger than its own thoughts. And in order to do this, this thoughts must be given a pliant form, must be easily folded and unfolded, so they are capable, finally, or maintaining a natural flexibility. All those short-sighted minds see clearly within their little ideas and see nothing in those of others; they are like those bad eyes that see from close range what is obscure and cannot perceive what is clear from afar. Night minds, minds of darkness.

George Gordon Byron photo

„If knowledge is power, ignorance cannot be bliss.“

—  James W. Loewen, livro Lies My Teacher Told Me
2000s, 2007, Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong (2007), As quoted in Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong https://books.google.com/books?id=5m2_xeJ4VdwC&dq=%22although+he+may+be+poor+not+a+man%22&source=gbs_navlinks_s (2007), New York: New Press, p. 342

Ramakrishna photo

„Knowledge leads to unity, and Ignorance to diversity.“

—  Ramakrishna Indian mystic and religious preacher 1836 - 1886
Râmakrishna : His Life and Sayings (1898), Saying 368

Thomas Paine photo

„Where knowledge is a duty, ignorance is a crime.“

—  Thomas Paine English and American political activist 1737 - 1809
1780s, "Public Good" (December 1780) http://www.thomas-paine-friends.org/paine-thomas_public-good-1780.html.

Edward Teller photo

„There is no case where ignorance should be preferred to knowledge — especially if the knowledge is terrible.“

—  Edward Teller Hungarian-American nuclear physicist 1908 - 2003
As quoted in Forbidden Knowledge : From Prometheus to Pornography (1996) by Roger Shattuck, p. 177

George Santayana photo
Bill Hicks photo
Ramakrishna photo
Maurice Merleau-Ponty photo

„What makes a philosopher is the movement which leads back without ceasing from knowledge to ignorance, from ignorance to knowledge, and a kind of rest in this movement.“

—  Maurice Merleau-Ponty French phenomenological philosopher 1908 - 1961
In Praise of Philosophy (1963), Context: Even those who have desired to work out a completely positive philosophy have been philosophers only to the extent that, at the same time, they have refused the right to install themselves in absolute knowledge. They taught not this knowledge, but its becoming in us, not the absolute but, at most, our absolute relation to it, as Kierkegaard said. What makes a philosopher is the movement which leads back without ceasing from knowledge to ignorance, from ignorance to knowledge, and a kind of rest in this movement. p. 5

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

x