„I call our world Flatland, not because we call it so, but to make its nature clearer to you, my happy readers, who are privileged to live in Space.“

—  Edwin Abbott Abbott, Context: I call our world Flatland, not because we call it so, but to make its nature clearer to you, my happy readers, who are privileged to live in Space.Imagine a vast sheet of paper on which straight Lines, Triangles, Squares, Pentagons, Hexagons, and other figures, instead of remaining fixed in their places, move freely about, on or in the surface, but without the power of rising above or sinking below it, very much like shadows — only hard and with luminous edges — and you will then have a pretty correct notion of my country and countrymen. Alas, a few years ago, I should have said "my universe": but now my mind has been opened to higher views of things. Chapter 1. Of the Nature of Flatland
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„In our calling, we have to choose; we must make our fortune either in this world or in the next, there is no middle way.“

—  Stendhal French writer 1783 - 1842
Dans notre état, il faut opter; il s'agit de faire fortune dans ce monde ou dans l'autre, il n'y a pas de milieu. Vol. I, ch. VIII

Karlheinz Deschner photo

„Enlightenment is terror; when you light up the world, you make its filth clearer.“

—  Karlheinz Deschner German writer and activist 1924 - 2014
Aufklärung ist Ärgernis, wer die Welt erhellt, macht ihren Dreck deutlicher. From "Die Haßberge" in Dornröschenträume und Stallgeruch: Über Franken, die Landschaft meines Lebens, Knesebech und Schuler, 1989.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe photo

„Scientific knowledge helps us mainly because it makes the wonder to which we are called by nature rather more intelligible.“

—  Johann Wolfgang von Goethe German writer, artist, and politician 1749 - 1832
Die Wissenschaft hilft uns vor allem, daß sie das Staunen, wozu wir von Natur berufen find. Maxim 417, trans. Stopp

 Zisi photo

„What is God-given is what we call human nature. To fulfil the law of our human nature is what we call the moral law. The cultivation of the moral law is what we call culture.“

—  Zisi Chinese philosopher -481 - -402 a.C.
Opening lines, p. 104 Variant translations: What is God-given is called nature; to follow nature is called Tao (the Way); to cultivate the Way is called culture. As translated by Lin Yutang in The Importance of Living (1937), p. 143 What is God-given is called human nature. To fulfill that nature is called the moral law (Tao). The cultivation of the moral law is called culture. As translated by Lin Yutang in From Pagan to Christian (1959), p. 85

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„Perhaps the central reason that Ahmadinejad’s message, and the hundreds of thousands of voices echoing his call throughout the world, are so dangerous is because the Free World is making precious little effort to assert its own message.“

—  Caroline Glick deputy managing editor of the Jerusalem Post 1969
Reprinted in [Live from NY’s 92nd Street Y continues, http://www.vaildaily.com/article/20071007/AE/71007002, Vail Daily, October 7, 2007] Discussing Mahmoud Ahmadinejad

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„It is this fragile nature of the earth's atmosphere that I want everybody to appreciate. It's what I call your place in space.“

—  Bill Nye American science educator, comedian, television host, actor, writer, scientist and former mechanical engineer 1955
[NewsBank, Meagan Engle, ‘Science Guy' Nye tells Miami students to ‘change the world', Oxford Press, Ohio, January 31, 2011]

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„Once again, Jesus calls those who follow him to share his passion. How can we convince the world by our preaching of the passion when we shrink from that passion in our own lives?“

—  Dietrich Bonhoeffer German Lutheran pastor, theologian, dissident anti-Nazi 1906 - 1945
Context: The passion of Christ is the victory of divine love over the powers of evil, and therefore it is the only supportable basis for Christian obedience. Once again, Jesus calls those who follow him to share his passion. How can we convince the world by our preaching of the passion when we shrink from that passion in our own lives? On the cross Jesus fulfilled the law he himself established and thus graciously keeps his disciples in the fellowship of his suffering. p. 142.

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„Call the world if you please "The vale of soul-making."“

—  John Keats English Romantic poet 1795 - 1821
Letter to George and Georgiana Keats (April 21, 1819)

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„I never lived, that I remember, what you call a common natural day.“

—  Margaret Fuller American feminist, poet, author, and activist 1810 - 1850
Context: I never lived, that I remember, what you call a common natural day. All my days are touched by the supernatural, for I feel the pressure of hidden causes, and the presence, sometimes the communion, of unseen powers. It needs not that I should ask the clairvoyant whether "a spirit-world projects into ours." As to the specific evidence, I would not tarnish my mind by hasty reception. The mind is not, I know, a highway, but a temple, and its doors should not be carelessly left open. Yet it were sin, if indolence or coldness excluded what had a claim to enter; and I doubt whether, in the eyes of pure intelligence, an ill-grounded hasty rejection be not a greater sign of weakness than an ill-grounded and hasty faith. "Free Hope" p. 128.

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„In short, the world abounds with simple delusions which we may call "happiness", if we be but able to entertain them.“

—  H.P. Lovecraft American author 1890 - 1937
Context: Frankly, I cannot conceive how any thoughtful man can really be happy. There is really nothing in the universe to live for, and unless one can dismiss thought and speculation from his mid, he is liable to be engulfed by the very immensity of creation. It is vastly better that he should amuse himself with religion, or any other convenient palliative to reality which comes to hand. … There is much relief from the burden of life to be derived from many sources. To the man of high animal spirits, there is the mere pleasure of being alive; the Joi de vivre, as our Gallick friends term it. To the credulous there is religion and its paradisal dreams. To the moralist, there is a certain satisfaction in right conduct. To the scientist there is the joy in pursuing truth which nearly counteracts the depressing revelations of truth. To the person of cultivated taste, there are the fine arts. To the man of humour, there is the sardonic delight of spying out pretensions and incongruities of life. To the poet there is the ability and privilege to fashion a little Arcadia in his fancy, wherein he may withdraw from the sordid reality of mankind at large. In short, the world abounds with simple delusions which we may call "happiness", if we be but able to entertain them. Letter to "The Keicomolo"—Kleiner, Cole, and Moe (October 1916), in Selected Letters I, 1911-1924 edited by August Derleth and Donald Wandrei, pp. 26-27

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„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“