„Often you'll see the same three or four data items together in lots of places: fields in a couple of classes, parameters in many method signatures. Bunches of data that hang around together really ought to be made into their own object.“

Fonte: Refactoring: Improving the Design of Existing Code, 1999, p. 81

Última atualização 4 de Junho de 2020. História

Citações relacionadas

Kent Beck photo
Kaoru Ishikawa photo
Ram Dass photo

„Information is just bits of data. Knowledge is putting them together. Wisdom is transcending them.“

—  Ram Dass American contemporary spiritual teacher and the author of the 1971 book Be Here Now 1931 - 2019

Jacques Bertin photo
Robert J. Shiller photo
Howard Bloom photo
Vernon L. Smith photo
Thomas Edison photo

„We really haven't got any great amount of data on the subject, and without data how can we reach any definite conclusions?“

—  Thomas Edison American inventor and businessman 1847 - 1931

As quoted in Thomas A. Edison, Benefactor of Mankind : The Romantic Life Story of the World's Greatest Inventor (1931) by Francis Trevelyan Miller, Ch. 25 : Edison's Views on Life — His Philosophy and Religion, p. 295.
Contexto: We really haven't got any great amount of data on the subject, and without data how can we reach any definite conclusions? All we have — everything — favors the idea of what religionists call the "Hereafter." Science, if it ever learns the facts, probably will find another more definitely descriptive term.

Eric Hobsbawm photo

„My object is to understand ad explain why things turned out the way they did, and how they hang together.“

—  Eric Hobsbawm, livro The Age of Extremes

Introduction
The Age of Extremes (1992)
Contexto: My object is to understand ad explain why things turned out the way they did, and how they hang together. For anyone of my age-group who has lived through all or most of the Short Twentieth Century this is inevitably also a autobiographical endeavor. We are talking about, amplifying (and correcting) our own memories. And we are talking as men and women of a particular time and place, involved, in various ways, in its history as actors in its dramas - however insignificant our parts - as observers of our times and, not least, as people whose views of the century have been formed by what we have come to see as its crucial events.

Carl Barus photo
André Maurois photo
Grace Hopper photo

„The Group started out by trying to design a language for stating procedures, but soon discovered that what was really required was a description of the data and a statement of the relationships between the data sets.“

—  Grace Hopper American computer scientist and United States Navy officer 1906 - 1992

As quoted in Management and the Computer of the Future (1962) by Sloan School of Management, p. 273
Contexto: We must include in any language with which we hope to describe complex data-processing situations the capability for describing data. We must also include a mechanism for determining the priorities to be applied to the data. These priorities are not fixed and are indicated in many cases by the data.
Thus we must have a language and a structure that will take care of the data descriptions and priorities, as well as the operations we wish to perform. If we think seriously about these problems, we find that we cannot work with procedures alone, since they are sequential. We need to define the problem instead of the procedures. The Language Structures Group of the Codasyl Committee has been studying the structure of languages that can be used to describe data-processing problems. The Group started out by trying to design a language for stating procedures, but soon discovered that what was really required was a description of the data and a statement of the relationships between the data sets. The Group has since begun writing an algebra of processes, the background for a theory of data processing.
Clearly, we must break away from the sequential and not limit the computers. We must state definitions and provide for priorities and descriptions of data. We must state relationships, not procedures.

F. Scott Fitzgerald photo
Taiichi Ohno photo
Banana Yoshimoto photo
Arthur Conan Doyle photo

„Data! data! data!" he cried impatiently. "I can't make bricks without clay.“

—  Arthur Conan Doyle, livro The Adventure of the Copper Beeches

Fonte: The Adventure of the Copper Beeches

Judea Pearl photo
G. E. M. Anscombe photo

„The command to a Christian couple is: "Grow in grace and love together."“

—  G. E. M. Anscombe British analytic philosopher 1919 - 2001

Contraception and Chastity (1975)
Contexto: If a kind of love cannot be commanded, we can't build our moral theology of marriage on the presumption that it will be present. Its absence is sad, but this sadness exists, it is very common. We should avoid, I think, using the indicative mood for what is really a commandment like the Scout Law ("A Boy Scout is kind to animals" - it means a Boy Scout ought to be kind to animals). For if we hear: "a Christian couple grow in grace and love together" doesn't the question arise "supposing they don't?" It clears the air to substitute the bite of what is clearly a precept for the sweetness of a rosy picture. The command to a Christian couple is: "Grow in grace and love together." But a joint command can only be jointly obeyed. Suppose it isn't? Well, there remains the separate precept to each and in an irremediably unhappy marriage, one ought still to love the other, though not perhaps feeling the affection that cannot be commanded. Thus the notion of the "marriage debt" is a very necessary one, and it alone is realistic: because it makes no assumption as to the state of the affections.
Looking at the rightness of the marriage act like this will help in another way. It will prevent us from assuming that the pleasant affection which exists between a happy and congenial pair is the fulfilment of the precept of love. (It may after all only be a complacent hiving off together in a narrow love.) We ought absolutely not to give out a teaching which is flattering to the lucky, and irrelevant to the unhappy. Looked at carefully, too, such teaching is altogether too rigorist in a new direction. People who are not quite happily married, not lucky in their married life, but nevertheless have a loyalty to the bond, are not, therefore, bound to abstain from intercourse.