„Experience used to be called The Soul. Experience as invisibility of man to man is at the same time more evident than anything.“

—  Ronald Laing, livro The Politics of Experience

Fonte: The Politics of Experience (1967), Ch. 1 : Experience as evidence
Contexto: I cannot experience your experience. You cannot experience my experience. We are both invisible men. All men are invisible to one another. Experience used to be called The Soul. Experience as invisibility of man to man is at the same time more evident than anything. Only experience is evident. Experience is the only evidence. Psychology is the logos of experience. Psychology is the structure of the evidence, and hence psychology is the science of sciences.

Obtido da Wikiquote. Última atualização 3 de Junho de 2021. História
Ronald Laing photo
Ronald Laing2
1927 - 1989

Citações relacionadas

E. W. Howe photo

„The experience of the world is worth more than the experience of any one man.“

—  E. W. Howe Novelist, magazine and newspaper editor 1853 - 1937

E.W. Howe's Monthly January 1912.

Dorothy L. Sayers photo
Ronald David Laing photo

„I cannot experience your experience. You cannot experience my experience. We are both invisible men.“

—  Ronald David Laing, livro The Politics of Experience

Fonte: The Politics of Experience (1967), Ch. 1 : Experience as evidence
Contexto: I cannot experience your experience. You cannot experience my experience. We are both invisible men. All men are invisible to one another. Experience used to be called The Soul. Experience as invisibility of man to man is at the same time more evident than anything. Only experience is evident. Experience is the only evidence. Psychology is the logos of experience. Psychology is the structure of the evidence, and hence psychology is the science of sciences.

Buckminster Fuller photo

„Every time man makes a new experiment he always learns more. He cannot learn less.“

—  Buckminster Fuller American architect, systems theorist, author, designer, inventor and futurist 1895 - 1983

1960s, Operating Manual for Spaceship Earth (1963)
Contexto: Every time man makes a new experiment he always learns more. He cannot learn less. He may learn that what he thought was true was not true. By the elimination of a false premise, his basic capital wealth which in his given lifetime is disembarrassed of further preoccupation with considerations of how to employ a worthless time-consuming hypothesis. Freeing his time for its more effective exploratory investment is to give man increased wealth.

Karlheinz Stockhausen photo
Ralph Waldo Emerson photo

„Our instinct uses "more" and "less" in application to man, of the presence of the soul, and not of its absence; the brave man is greater than the coward; the true, the benevolent, the wise, is more a man, and not less, than the fool and knave.“

—  Ralph Waldo Emerson American philosopher, essayist, and poet 1803 - 1882

1840s, Essays: First Series (1841), Compensation
Contexto: We feel defrauded of the retribution due to evil acts, because the criminal adheres to his vice and contumacy, and does not come to a crisis or judgment anywhere in visible nature. There is no stunning confutation of his nonsense before men and angels. Has he therefore outwitted the law? Inasmuch as he carries the malignity and the lie with him, he so far deceases from nature. In some manner there will be a demonstration of the wrong to the understanding also; but should we not see it, this deadly deduction makes square the eternal account.
Neither can it be said, on the other hand, that the gain of rectitude must be bought by any loss. There is no penalty to virtue; no penalty to wisdom; they are proper additions of being. In a virtuous action, I properly am; in a virtuous act, I add to the world; I plant into deserts conquered from Chaos and Nothing, and see the darkness receding on the limits of the horizon. There can be no excess to love; none to knowledge; none to beauty, when these attributes are considered in the purest sense. The soul refuses limits, and always affirms an Optimism, never a Pessimism.
His life is a progress, and not a station. His instinct is trust. Our instinct uses "more" and "less" in application to man, of the presence of the soul, and not of its absence; the brave man is greater than the coward; the true, the benevolent, the wise, is more a man, and not less, than the fool and knave. There is no tax on the good of virtue; for that is the incoming of God himself, or absolute existence, without any comparative. Material good has its tax, and if it came without desert or sweat, has no root in me, and the next wind will blow it away. But all the good of nature is the soul's, and may be had, if paid for in nature's lawful coin, that is, by labor which the heart and the head allow. I no longer wish to meet a good I do not earn, for example, to find a pot of buried gold, knowing that it brings with it new burdens. I do not wish more external goods, — neither possessions, nor honors, nor powers, nor persons. The gain is apparent; the tax is certain. But there is no tax on the knowledge that the compensation exists, and that it is not desirable to dig up treasure. Herein I rejoice with a serene eternal peace. I contract the boundaries of possible mischief. I learn the wisdom of St. Bernard, — "Nothing can work me damage except myself; the harm that I sustain I carry about with me, and never am a real sufferer but by my own fault."

Citát „It is more pleasant and useful to go through the 'experience of the revolution' than to write about it.“
Vladimir Lenin photo
Frithjof Schuon photo

„First of all one has to answer the question of why the painful experiences that man must undergo are called "trials."“

—  Frithjof Schuon Swiss philosopher 1907 - 1998

We would reply that these experiences are trials in relation to our faith, which indicates that with regard to troubling or painful experiences we have duties resulting from our human vocation; in other words, we must prove our faith in relation to God and in relation to ourselves. In relation to God, by our intelligence, our sense of the absolute, and thus our sense of relativities and proportions; and in relation to ourselves, by our character, our resignation to destiny, our gratitude. There are in fact two ways to overcome the traces that evil, or more precisely suffering, leaves in the soul: these are, firstly, our awareness of the Sovereign Good, which coincides with our hope to the extent that this awareness penetrates us; and secondly, our acceptance of what, in religious language, is called the "will of God"; and assuredly it is a great victory over oneself to accept a destiny because it is God's will and for no other reason.
[2003, Survey of Metaphysics and Esoterism, World Wisdom, 215, 978-0-94153227-3]
Spiritual life, Trials

Czeslaw Milosz photo

„Never has there been a close study of how necessary to a man are the experiences which we clumsily call aesthetic.“

—  Czeslaw Milosz, livro The Captive Mind

The Captive Mind (1953)
Contexto: Never has there been a close study of how necessary to a man are the experiences which we clumsily call aesthetic. Such experiences are associated with works of art for only an insignificant number of individuals. The majority find pleasure of an aesthetic nature in the mere fact of their existence within the stream of life. In the cities, the eye meets colorful store displays, the diversity of human types. Looking at passers-by, one can guess from their faces the story of their lives. This movement of the imagination when a man is walking through a crowd has an erotic tinge; his emotions are very close to physiological sensations.

„Man is constantly being assured that he has more power than ever before in history, but his daily experience is one of powerlessness. …“

—  Richard M. Weaver American scholar 1910 - 1963

Fonte: Ideas have Consequences (1948), p. 16.
Contexto: Man is constantly being assured that he has more power than ever before in history, but his daily experience is one of powerlessness. … If he is with a business organization, the odds are great that he has sacrificed every other kind of independence in return for that dubious one known as financial.

Ursula Goodenough photo

„This mythos comes to us, often in experiences called revelation, from the sages and the artists of past and present times.“

—  Ursula Goodenough, livro The Sacred Depths of Nature

Fonte: The Sacred Depths of Nature (1998), p. 174
Contexto: Humans need stories — grand compelling stories — that help to orient us in our lives in the cosmos. The Epic of Evolution is such a story, beautifully suited to anchor our search for planetary consensus, telling us of our nature, our place, our context. Moreover, responses to this story — what we are calling religious naturalism — can yield deep and abiding spiritual experiences. And then, after that, we need other stories as well, human-centered stories, a mythos that embodies our ideals and our passions. This mythos comes to us, often in experiences called revelation, from the sages and the artists of past and present times.

Aldous Huxley photo

„Experience is not what happens to a man; it is what a man does with what happens to him.“

—  Aldous Huxley English writer 1894 - 1963

Texts and Pretexts (1932), p. 5
Variante: Experience is not what happens to you; it's what you do with what happens to you.
Fonte: Texts & Pretexts: An Anthology With Commentaries
Contexto: The poet is, etymologically, the maker. Like all makers, he requires a stock of raw materials — in his case, experience. Now experience is not a matter of having actually swum the Hellespont, or danced with the dervishes, or slept in a doss-house. It is a matter of sensibility and intuition, of seeing and hearing the significant things, of paying attention at the right moments, of understanding and co-ordinating. Experience is not what happens to a man; it is what a man does with what happens to him. It is a gift for dealing with the accidents of existence, not the accidents themselves. By a happy dispensation of nature, the poet generally possesses the gift of experience in conjunction with that of expression.

Steve Jobs photo

„And the reason they were able to do that was that they've had more experiences or they have thought more about their experiences than other people“

—  Steve Jobs American entrepreneur and co-founder of Apple Inc. 1955 - 2011

Interviewed with Wired: Gary Wolf. Steve Jobs: The Next Insanely Great Thing http://archive.wired.com/wired/archive/4.02/jobs_pr.html (February 1996)
1990s
Contexto: Creativity is just connecting things. When you ask creative people how they did something, they feel a little guilty because they didn't really do it, they just saw something. It seemed obvious to them after a while. That's because they were able to connect experiences they've had and synthesize new things. And the reason they were able to do that was that they've had more experiences or they have thought more about their experiences than other people... Unfortunately, that's too rare a commodity. A lot of people in our industry haven't had very diverse experiences. So they don't have enough dots to connect, and they end up with very linear solutions without a broad perspective on the problem. The broader one's understanding of the human experience, the better design we will have.

Plotinus photo
Augusten Burroughs photo

„Even when we lose an arm or a leg, there's not less of us but more. Human experience weighs more than human tissue.“

—  Augusten Burroughs American writer 1965

Fonte: This Is How: Proven Aid in Overcoming Shyness, Molestation, Fatness, Spinsterhood, Grief, Disease, Lushery, Decrepitude & More. For Young and Old Alike.

Helen Rowland photo
Jon Krakauer photo
H. G. Wells photo

„Heresies are experiments in man's unsatisfied search for truth.“

—  H. G. Wells, livro Crux Ansata

Crux Ansata: An Indictment of the Roman Catholic Church (1943)

Jerry Coyne photo

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