„The world is kept alive only by heretics: the heretic Christ, the heretic Copernicus, the heretic Tolstoy. Our symbol of faith is heresy: tomorrow is an inevitable heresy of today, which has turned into a pillar of salt, and to yesterday, which has scattered to dust. Today denies yesterday, but is a denial of denial tomorrow.“

"Tomorrow" (1919), as translated in A Soviet Heretic : Essays by Yevgeny Zamyatin (1970) edited and translated by Mirra Ginsburg
Contexto: Every today is at the same time both a cradle and a shroud: a shroud for yesterday, a cradle for tomorrow. Today, yesterday, and tomorrow are equally near to one another, and equally far. They are generations, they are grandfathers, fathers, and grandsons. And grandsons invariably love and hate the fathers; the fathers invariably hate and love the grandfathers.
Today is doomed to die — because yesterday died, and because tomorrow will be born. Such is the wise and cruel law. Cruel, because it condemns to eternal dissatisfaction those who already today see the distant peaks of tomorrow; wise, because eternal dissatisfaction is the only pledge of eternal movement forward, eternal creation. He who has found his ideal today is, like Lot's wife, already turned to a pillar of salt, has already sunk into the earth and does not move ahead. The world is kept alive only by heretics: the heretic Christ, the heretic Copernicus, the heretic Tolstoy. Our symbol of faith is heresy: tomorrow is an inevitable heresy of today, which has turned into a pillar of salt, and to yesterday, which has scattered to dust. Today denies yesterday, but is a denial of denial tomorrow. This is the constant dialectic path which in a grandiose parabola sweeps the world into infinity. Yesterday, the thesis; today, the antithesis, and tomorrow, the synthesis.

Yevgeny Zamyatin photo
Yevgeny Zamyatin2
1884 - 1937

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„faith need not be kept with heretics“

—  John Locke English philosopher and physician 1632 - 1704

Journal entry (25 January 1676), quoted in John Lough (ed.), Locke's Travels in France 1675-1679 (Cambridge University Press, 1953), p. 20.
Original: (la) Nulla fides servanda cum Hereticis, nisi satis validi sunt ad se defendendos

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„If heretics no longer horrify us today, as they once did our forefathers, is it certain that it is because there is more charity in our hearts? Or would it not too often be, perhaps, without our daring to say so, because the bone of contention, that is to say, the very substance of our faith, no longer interests us? Men of too familiar and too passive a faith, perhaps for us dogmas are no longer the Mystery on which we live, the Mystery which is to be accomplished in us. Consequently then, heresy no longer shocks us; at least, it no longer convulses us like something trying to tear the soul of our souls away from us…. And that is why we have no trouble in being kind to heretics, and no repugnance in rubbing shoulders with them.

In reality, bias against ‘heretics’ is felt today just as it used to be. Many give way to it as much as their forefathers used to do. Only, they have turned it against political adversaries. Those are the only ones with whom they refuse to mix. Sectarianism has only changed its object and taken other forms, because the vital interest has shifted. Should we dare to say that this shifting is progress?

It is not always charity, alas, which has grown greater, or which has become more enlightened: it is often faith, the taste for the things of eternity, which has grown less. Injustice and violence are still reigning; but they are now in the service of degraded passions.“

—  Henri de Lubac Jesuit theologian and cardinal 1896 - 1991

Henri de Lubac, Paradoxes of Faith (San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1987), pp. 226-227

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„The “treatment” can have only one goal: to convert the heretic to the true faith, to transform the homosexual into a heterosexual.“

—  Thomas Szasz Hungarian psychiatrist 1920 - 2012

p. 172.
The Manufacture of Madness: A Comparative Study of the Inquisition and the Mental Health Movement (1997)

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„Had I been a Christian, I would undoubtedly have been considered a heretic, for what the world has always needed is more heretics and less authority. There can be no order or progress without discipline, but authority can be quite different.“

—  Louis L'Amour, livro The Walking Drum

Ch. 31
The Walking Drum (1984)
Contexto: How much could I tell them? How much dared I tell them? What was the point at which acceptance would begin to yield to doubt? For the mind must be prepared for knowledge as one prepares a field for planting, and a discovery made too soon is no better than a discovery not made at all. Had I been a Christian, I would undoubtedly have been considered a heretic, for what the world has always needed is more heretics and less authority. There can be no order or progress without discipline, but authority can be quite different. Authority, in this world in which I moved, implied belief in and acceptance of a dogma, and dogma is invariably wrong, as knowledge is always in a state of transition. The radical ideas of today are often the conservative policies of tomorrow, and dogma is left protesting by the wayside.  Each generation has a group that wishes to impose a static pattern on events, a static pattern that would hold society forever immobile in a position favorable to the group in question. <!--
Much of the conflict in the minds and arguments of those about me was due to a basic conflict between religious doctrines based primarily upon faith, and Greek philosophy, which was an attempt to interpret experience by reason. Or so it seemed to me, a man with much to learn.

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„Skepticism, riddling the faith of yesterday, prepared the way for the faith of tomorrow.“

—  Romain Rolland French author 1866 - 1944

As quoted in The Great Quotations (1960) by George Seldes, p. 864

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„What a valiant woman. She braves the two greatest kings by land and sea. If she were not a heretic she would be worth a whole world.“

—  Pope Sixtus V pope 1520 - 1590

On Queen Elizabeth I of England, in 1587; reported in Colin Bingham, Men and Affairs: A Modern Miscellany (1967), p. 48.
Attributed

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„How many things served us yesterday for articles of faith, which today are fables for us?“

—  Michel De Montaigne, The Complete Essays

Combien de choses nous servoyent hier d’articles de foy, qui nous sont fables aujourd’huy?
Book I, Ch. 27
Essais (1595), Book I
Fonte: The Complete Essays

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„Faith, sir, we are here today, and gone tomorrow.“

—  Aphra Behn British playwright, poet, translator and fiction writer 1640 - 1689

The Lucky Chance, Act IV (1686).

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„In our windy world
What's up is faith, what's down is heresy.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson British poet laureate 1809 - 1892

Harold, Act i, Scene 1, reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919)

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„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“