„[The Analytical Engine] might act upon other things besides number, were objects found whose mutual fundamental relations could be expressed by those of the abstract science of operations, and which should be also susceptible of adaptations to the action of the operating notation and mechanism of the engine…Supposing, for instance, that the fundamental relations of pitched sounds in the science of harmony and of musical composition were susceptible of such expression and adaptations, the engine might compose elaborate and scientific pieces of music of any degree of complexity or extent.“

As quoted by Menabrea, Luigi (1842). Sketch of the Analytical Engine invented by Charles Babbage Esq.. Scientific Memoirs (Richard Taylor): 694.

Ada Lovelace photo
Ada Lovelace
matemática britânica 1815 - 1852

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Qian Xuesen photo
Charles Babbage photo

„As soon as an Analytical Engine exists, it will necessarily guide the future course of the science.“

—  Charles Babbage mathematician, philosopher, inventor and mechanical engineer who originated the concept of a programmable computer 1791 - 1871

Passages from the Life of a Philosopher (1864), ch. 8 "Of the Analytical Engine"
Passages from the Life of a Philosopher (1864)
Contexto: As soon as an Analytical Engine exists, it will necessarily guide the future course of the science. Whenever any result is sought by its aid, the question will then arise — by what course of calculation can these results be arrived at by the machine in the shortest time?

„Science is susceptible of infinite progress. But how can science be susceptible of infinite progress if its object does not have an inner infinity?“

—  Leo Strauss Classical philosophy specialist and father of neoconservativism 1899 - 1973

"Why We Remain Jews" (1962)
Contexto: Science, as the positivist understands it, is susceptible of infinite progress. That you learn in every elementary school today, I believe. Every result of science is provisional and subject to future revision, and this will never change. In other words, fifty thousand years from now there will still be results entirely different from those now, but still subject to revision. Science is susceptible of infinite progress. But how can science be susceptible of infinite progress if its object does not have an inner infinity? The belief admitted by all believers in science today — that science is by its nature essentially progressive, and eternally progressive — implies, without saying it, that being is mysterious. And here is the point where the two lines I have tried to trace do not meet exactly, but where they come within hailing distance. And, I believe, to expect more in a general way, of people in general, would be unreasonable.

James Clerk Maxwell photo

„The whole science of heat is founded Thermometry and Calorimetry, and when these operations are understood we may proceed to the third step, which is the investigation of those relations between the thermal and the mechanical properties of substances which form the subject of Thermodynamics.“

—  James Clerk Maxwell Scottish physicist 1831 - 1879

The whole of this part of the subject depends on the consideration of the Intrinsic Energy of a system of bodies, as depending on the temperature and physical state, as well as the form, motion, and relative position of these bodies. Of this energy, however, only a part is available for the purpose of producing mechanical work, and though the energy itself is indestructible, the available part is liable to diminution by the action of certain natural processes, such as conduction and radiation of heat, friction, and viscosity. These processes, by which energy is rendered unavailable as a source of work, are classed together under the name of the Dissipation of Energy.
Theory of Heat http://books.google.com/books?id=DqAAAAAAMAAJ "Preface" (1871)

Qian Xuesen photo
Henry R. Towne photo

„The switch from 'steam engines' to 'heat engines' signals the transition from engineering practice to theoretical science.“

—  Hans Christian von Baeyer American physicist 1938

Fonte: Information, The New Language of Science (2003), Chapter 18, Information is Physical, The cost of forgetting, p. 154

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Igor Stravinsky photo
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Benoît Mandelbrot photo

„Engineering is too important to wait for science.“

—  Benoît Mandelbrot Polish-born, French and American mathematician 1924 - 2010

As quoted in "Fractal Finance" by Greg Phelan in Yale Economic Review (Fall 2005) http://www.yaleeconomicreview.com/issues/fall2005/fractalfinance

Edgard Varèse photo

„Our musical alphabet is poor and illogical. Music, which should pulsate with life, needs new means of expression, and science alone can infuse it with youthful vigor.“

—  Edgard Varèse French composer 1883 - 1965

Edgard Varèse lecture, edited by Chou Wen-Chung, published in: 391, Nr. 5. June 17, 1917. Translated by Louise Varèse; Quoted in: Classic Essays on Twentieth-Century Music: A Continuing Symposium (1996), .
Contexto: Our musical alphabet is poor and illogical. Music, which should pulsate with life, needs new means of expression, and science alone can infuse it with youthful vigor.
Why, Italian Futurists, have you slavishly reproduced only what is commonplace and boring in the bustle of our daily lives.
I dream of instruments obedient to my thought and which with their contribution of a whole new world of unsuspected sounds, will lend themselves to the exigencies of my inner rhythm.

Claude Debussy photo

„Music would take over at the point at which words become powerless, with the one and only object of expressing that which nothing but music could express.“

—  Claude Debussy French composer 1862 - 1918

As quoted in Debussy (1989) by Paul Holmes, p. 36
Contexto: Music would take over at the point at which words become powerless, with the one and only object of expressing that which nothing but music could express. For this, I need a text by a poet who, resorting to discreet suggestion rather than full statement, will enable me to graft my dream upon his dream — who will give me plain human beings in a setting belonging to no particular period or country. … Then I do not wish my music to drown the words, nor to delay the course of the action. I want no purely musical developments which are not called for inevitably by the text. In opera there is always too much singing. Music should be as swift and mobile as the words themselves.

Friedrich Bauer photo

„Software engineering is the part of computer science which is too difficult for the computer scientist.“

—  Friedrich Bauer German computer scientist 1924 - 2015

Bauer (1971) "Software Engineering." Information Processing: Proceedings of the IFIP Congress 1971, Ljubljana, Yugoslavia, August 23-28, 1971.

„The issue of 'science' does not intrude itself directly upon the occasion of the performance of a musical work, at least a non-electronically produced work, since—as has been said—there is at least a question as to whether the question as to whether musical composition is to be regarded as a science or not is indeed really a question; but there is no doubt that the question as to whether musical discourse or—more precisely—the theory of music should be subject to the methodological criteria of scientific method and the attendant scientific language is a question, except that the question is really not the normative one of whether it 'should be' or 'must be,' but the factual one that it is, not because of the nature of musical theory, but because of the nature and scope of scientific method and language, whose domain of application is such that if it is not extensible to musical theory, then musical theory is not a theory in any sense in which the term ever has been employed. This should sound neither contentious nor portentous, rather it should be obvious to the point of virtual tautology.“

—  Milton Babbitt American composer 1916 - 2011

From Milton Babbitt, "The Structure and Function of Musical Theory", College Music Symposium, Vol. 5 (Fall 1965), pp. 49-60; reprinted in Perspectives on Contemporary Music Theory, ed. Benjamin Boretz and Edward T. Cone (New York: Norton, 1972), pp. 10-21, ISBN 0393005488, and in Milton Babbitt, The Collected Essays of Milton Babbitt, ed. Stephen Peles, with Stephen Dembski, Andrew Mead, and Joseph N. Straus (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2003), pp. 191-201, ISBN 0691089663.

Justus von Liebig photo

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“