„Newborn Love has short wings. He can scarcely
hold them up, and does not spread them out to fly.“

—  Torquato Tasso, Aminta

Act II, scene ii.
Aminta (1573)
Original: (co) Amor nascente hà corte l'ali, à pena
Può sù tenerle, e non le spiega à volo.

Obtido da Wikiquote. Última atualização 3 de Junho de 2021. História
Torquato Tasso photo
Torquato Tasso8
1544 - 1595

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„I fly through memory to find a newborn love.“

—  Dejan Stojanovic poet, writer, and businessman 1959

Ghazal of Love http://www.poetrysoup.com/famous/poem/21368/Ghazal_of_Love
From the poems written in English

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„Why does she have wings?'
So she can fly.“

—  Sarah Dessen, livro The Truth About Forever

Fonte: The Truth About Forever

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„Can I love someone… and still think/fly? Love is flying, sown, floating. Thought is solitary flight, beating wings.“

—  Susan Sontag American writer and filmmaker, professor, and activist 1933 - 2004

Fonte: As Consciousness is Harnessed to Flesh: Journals and Notebooks, 1964-1980

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„Feet, what do I need them for
If I have wings to fly.“

—  Frida Kahlo Mexican painter 1907 - 1954

Pies, para qué los quiero
Si tengo alas para volar.
Diary illustration, dated 1953, preceding a foot amputation in August of that year; reproduced on page 415 of Frida: A Biography of Frida Kahlo by Hayden Herrera (1983)
1946 - 1953

„Those who gave away their wings are sad not to see them fly.“

—  Antonio Porchia Italian Argentinian poet 1885 - 1968

Los que dieron sus alas están tristes, de no verlas volar.
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„He has a right to argue for them as eloquently as he can, in season and out of season. He has a right to teach them to his children. But certainly he has no right to be protected against the free criticism of those who do not hold them. . . . They are free to shoot back. But they can't disarm their enemy.“

—  H.L. Mencken American journalist and writer 1880 - 1956

"Aftermath" in the Baltimore Evening Sun http://www.positiveatheism.org/hist/menck05.htm#SCOPESD (14 September 1925)
1920s
Contexto: Once more, alas, I find myself unable to follow the best Liberal thought. What the World's contention amounts to, at bottom, is simply the doctrine that a man engaged in combat with superstition should be very polite to superstition. This, I fear, is nonsense. The way to deal with superstition is not to be polite to it, but to tackle it with all arms, and so rout it, cripple it, and make it forever infamous and ridiculous. Is it, perchance, cherished by persons who should know better? Then their folly should be brought out into the light of day, and exhibited there in all its hideousness until they flee from it, hiding their heads in shame.
True enough, even a superstitious man has certain inalienable rights. He has a right to harbor and indulge his imbecilities as long as he pleases, provided only he does not try to inflict them upon other men by force. He has a right to argue for them as eloquently as he can, in season and out of season. He has a right to teach them to his children. But certainly he has no right to be protected against the free criticism of those who do not hold them.... They are free to shoot back. But they can't disarm their enemy.
The meaning of religious freedom, I fear, is sometimes greatly misapprehended. It is taken to be a sort of immunity, not merely from governmental control but also from public opinion. A dunderhead gets himself a long-tailed coat, rises behind the sacred desk, and emits such bilge as would gag a Hottentot. Is it to pass unchallenged? If so, then what we have is not religious freedom at all, but the most intolerable and outrageous variety of religious despotism. Any fool, once he is admitted to holy orders, becomes infallible. Any half-wit, by the simple device of ascribing his delusions to revelation, takes on an authority that is denied to all the rest of us.... What should be a civilized man's attitude toward such superstitions? It seems to me that the only attitude possible to him is one of contempt. If he admits that they have any intellectual dignity whatever, he admits that he himself has none. If he pretends to a respect for those who believe in them, he pretends falsely, and sinks almost to their level. When he is challenged he must answer honestly, regardless of tender feelings.

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„Very small, child, are the flying days of love, and men and women must catch them when they can, if they are to know love at all.“

—  Gene Wolfe, livro Starwater Strains

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Fiction

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„I think Ramos has sorted their (Tottenham Hotspur) defense out and if he can hold of Berbatov then i can see them threatening the top four next season.“

—  Simon Hill Australian television presenter 1967

January 2008, Tottenham Hotspur Subsequently lost Dimitar Berbatov and made their worst start for 53 years in the 2008/09 Premier League season
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„Them as can do, has to do for them as can't. And someone has to speak up for them as has no voices.“

—  Terry Pratchett, livro The Wee Free Men

Variante: Them as can do has to do for them as can't. And someone has to speak up for them as has no voices.
Fonte: The Wee Free Men

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„It is absolutely vital to hold it as lightly as possible - rather as one might pick up a newborn bird.“

—  Yehudi Menuhin American violinist and conductor 1916 - 1999

On proper holding of the bow
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„Hold fast to dreams
For if dreams die
Life is a broken-winged bird
That cannot fly.“

—  Langston Hughes American writer and social activist 1902 - 1967

"Dreams," from the anthology Golden Slippers: An Anthology of Negro Poetry for Young Readers, ed. Arna Bontemps (1941)

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„But he who does not let his infirmity be known can scarcely expect to receive a cure. Love is an invisible wound within the body, and, since it has its source in nature, it is a long-lasting ill.“

—  Marie de France, Guigemar

Mes ki ne mustre s'enferté
A peine en peot aver santé:
Amur est plaie dedenz cors,
E si ne piert nïent defors.
Ceo est un mal que lunges tient,
Pur ceo que de nature vient.
"Guigemar", line 481; p. 49.
Lais

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