„Two meanings have our lightest fantasies, —
One of the flesh, and of the spirit one.“

Sonnet XXXIV
Sonnets (1844)

Última atualização 22 de Maio de 2020. História
James Russell Lowell photo
James Russell Lowell12
1819 - 1891

Citações relacionadas

Aurelius Augustinus photo
Robert Graves photo
Laura Antoniou photo

„My fantasies have never been safe ones.“

—  Laura Antoniou American novelist 1963

Fonte: "Unsafe at Any Speed or: Safe, Sane and Consensual, My Fanny", p. 12

Hermann Hesse photo

„In each individual the spirit has become flesh, in each man the creation suffers, within each one a redeemer is nailed to the cross.“

—  Hermann Hesse, livro Demian

Fonte: Demian (1919), p. 9. Prologue
Contexto: Novelists when they write novels tend to take an almost godlike attitude toward their subject, pretending to a total comprehension of the story, a man's life, which they can therefore recount as God Himself might, nothing standing between them and the naked truth, the entire story meaningful in every detail. I am as little able to do this as the novelist is, even though my story is more important to me than any novelist's is to him — for this is my story; it is the story of a man, not of an invented, or possible, or idealized, or otherwise absent figure, but of a unique being of flesh and blood. Yet, what a real living human being is made of seems to be less understood today than at any time before, and men — each one of whom represents a unique and valuable experiment on the part of nature — are therefore shot wholesale nowadays. If we were not something more than unique human beings, if each one of us could really be done away with once and for all by a single bullet, story telling would lose all purpose. But every man is more than just himself; he also represents the unique, the very special and always significant and remarkable point at which the world's phenomena intersect, only once in this way and never again. That is why every man's story is important, eternal, sacred; that is why every man, as long as he lives and fulfills the will of nature, is wondrous, and worthy of every consideration. In each individual the spirit has become flesh, in each man the creation suffers, within each one a redeemer is nailed to the cross.
Few people nowadays know what man is. Many sense this ignorance and die the more easily because of it, the same way that I will die more easily once I have completed this story.

Karl Wilhelm Friedrich Schlegel photo

„It is equally fatal for the spirit to have a system and to have none. One must thus decide to join the two.“

—  Karl Wilhelm Friedrich Schlegel German poet, critic and scholar 1772 - 1829

As quoted in Divine Madness : On Interpreting Literature, Music, and The Visual Arts Ironically (2002) by Lars Elleström, p. 50
Variant translations, of the paradoxical statement which begins in German with Es ist gleich tödlich für den Geist, ein System zu haben, und keins zu haben.:
It is equally fatal for the spirit, to have a system and not to have.
The Innovations of Idealism (2003) by Rüdiger Bubner, p. 193
It is equally fatal for the spirit to have a system and to have none. It will simply have to decide to combine the two.
As quoted in Friedrich Schlegel and the Emergence of Romantic Philosophy (2007) by Elizabeth Millán-Zaibert, p. 203
It is equally fatal for the spirit to have a system, and to have none. So the spirit must indeed resolve to combine the two.
As quoted in Hegel : Lectures on the History of Philosophy 1825-6 : Volume I, (2009) by Robert F. Brown, footnote, p. 59

John Milton photo
William Congreve photo
William Tyndale photo

„The spirit is willing but the flesh is weak.“

—  William Tyndale Bible translator and agitator from England 1494 - 1536

Matthew 26:41.

Clive Barker photo
Sherrilyn Kenyon photo

„I walk as one unclothed of flesh,
I wash my spirit clean;
I see old miracles afresh,
And wonders yet unseen.“

—  Francis William Bourdillon British poet 1852 - 1921

" The Chantry Of The Cherubim http://www.bartleby.com/236/219.html" in The Oxford Book of English Mystical Verse (1917) by D. H. S. Nicholson.
Contexto: p>I walk as one unclothed of flesh,
I wash my spirit clean;
I see old miracles afresh,
And wonders yet unseen.
I will not leave Thee till Thou give
Some word whereby my soul may live!I listened — but no voice I heard;
I looked — no likeness saw;
Slowly the joy of flower and bird
Did like a tide withdraw;
And in the heaven a silent star
Smiled on me, infinitely far.</p

Rumi photo
Lionel Richie photo

„Two hearts,
Two hearts that beat as one
Our lives have just begun.“

—  Lionel Richie American singer-songwriter, musician, record producer and actor 1949

Endless Love (1981).
Song lyrics

John Keats photo

„Feel we these things? — that moment have we stept
Into a sort of oneness, and our state
Is like a floating spirit's.“

—  John Keats, Endymion

Bk. I, l. 789
Endymion (1818)
Contexto: Ghosts of melodious prophesyings rave
Round every spot where trod Apollo's foot;
Bronze clarions awake, and faintly bruit,
Where long ago a giant battle was;
And, from the turf, a lullaby doth pass
In every place where infant Orpheus slept.
Feel we these things? — that moment have we stept
Into a sort of oneness, and our state
Is like a floating spirit's. But there are
Richer entanglements, enthralments far
More self-destroying, leading, by degrees,
To the chief intensity: the crown of these
Is made of love and friendship, and sits high
Upon the forehead of humanity.

Henry Miller photo
Barack Obama photo
Heinrich Heine photo

„I am speaking of the religion whose earliest dogmas contain a condemnation of the flesh, and which not merely grants the spirit superiority over the flesh but also deliberately mortifies the flesh in order to glorify the spirit. I am speaking of the religion whose unnatural mission actually introduced sin and hypocrisy into the world, since just because of the condemnation of the flesh the most innocent pleasures of the senses became a sin and just because of the impossibility of our being wholly spirit hypocrisy inevitably developed.“

—  Heinrich Heine German poet, journalist, essayist, and literary critic 1797 - 1856

Ich spreche von jener Religion, in deren ersten Dogmen eine Verdammnis alles Fleisches enthalten ist, und die dem Geiste nicht bloß eine Obermacht über das Fleisch zugesteht, sondern auch dieses abtöten will, um den Geist zu verherrlichen; ich spreche von jener Religion, durch deren unnatürliche Aufgabe ganz eigentlich die Sünde und die Hypokrisie in die Welt gekommen, indem eben durch die Verdammnis des Fleisches die unschuldigsten Sinnenfreuden eine Sünde geworden und durch die Unmöglichkeit, ganz Geist zu sein, die Hypokrisie sich ausbilden mußte.
Fonte: The Romantic School (1836), p. 3

Ken Wilber photo

„A full-spectrum approach to human consciousness and behavior means that men and women have available to them a spectrum of knowing — a spectrum that includes, at the very least, the eye of flesh, the eye of mind, and the eye of spirit.“

—  Ken Wilber American writer and public speaker 1949

The Eye of Spirit : An Integral Vision for a World Gone Slightly Mad (1997)
Contexto: An acknowledgment of the full spectrum of consciousness would profoundly alter the course of every one of the modern disciplines it touches — and that, of course, is an essential aspect of integral studies... A full-spectrum approach to human consciousness and behavior means that men and women have available to them a spectrum of knowing — a spectrum that includes, at the very least, the eye of flesh, the eye of mind, and the eye of spirit.