„Spring in the world!
And all things are made new!“

—  Richard Hovey, "Spring", p. 58.
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Richard Hovey16
American writer 1864 - 1900
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„Lifeless in appearance, sluggish
dazed spring approaches —
They enter the new world naked,
cold, uncertain of all
save that they enter.“

—  William Carlos Williams American poet 1883 - 1963
Context: Lifeless in appearance, sluggish dazed spring approaches — They enter the new world naked, cold, uncertain of all save that they enter. All about them The cold, familiar wind — Now the grass, tomorrow the stiff curl of wildcarrot leaf One by one objects are defined — It quickens: clarity, outline of leaf But now the stark dignity of entrance — Still, the profound change has come upon them: rooted, they grip down and begin to awaken. "Spring and All"

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„Steel on the skyline
Sky made of glass
Made for a real world
All things must pass“

—  David Bowie British musician, actor, record producer and arranger 1947 - 2016
Context: Steel on the skyline Sky made of glass Made for a real world All things must pass Ooo Waiting for something Looking for someone Is there no reason? "Heathen (The Rays)"

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„Spring is here my friends and a new chapter begins.“

—  Jack Layton Leader of the New Democratic Party of Canada 1950 - 2011
" 2011 Election Night Victory Speech http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xOFXnnu481c." May 2, 2011

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„The first day of spring is one thing, and the first spring day is another.“

—  Henry Van Dyke American diplomat 1852 - 1933
Context: The first day of spring is one thing, and the first spring day is another. The difference between them is sometimes as great as a month. Fisherman's Luck http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext97/fshlk10.txt, ch. 5 (1899)

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Victor Hugo photo

„Behold, then, a new religion, a new society; upon this twofold foundation there must inevitably spring up a new poetry.“

—  Victor Hugo French poet, novelist, and dramatist 1802 - 1885
Context: Behold, then, a new religion, a new society; upon this twofold foundation there must inevitably spring up a new poetry. Previously following therein the course pursued by the ancient polytheism and philosophy, the purely epic muse of the ancients had studied nature in only a single aspect, casting aside without pity almost everything in art which, in the world subjected to its imitation, had not relation to a certain type of beauty. A type which was magnificent at first, but, as always happens with everything systematic, became in later times false, trivial and conventional. Christianity leads poetry to the truth. Like it, the modern muse will see things in a higher and broader light. It will realize that everything in creation is not humanly beautiful, that the ugly exists beside the beautiful, the unshapely beside the graceful, the grotesque on the reverse of the sublime, evil with good, darkness with light. It will ask itself if the narrow and relative sense of the artist should prevail over the infinite, absolute sense of the Creator; if it is for man to correct God; if a mutilated nature will be the more beautiful for the mutilation; if art has the right to duplicate, so to speak, man, life, creation; if things will progress better when their muscles and their vigour have been taken from them; if, in short, to be incomplete is the best way to be harmonious. Then it is that, with its eyes fixed upon events that are both laughable and redoubtable, and under the influence of that spirit of Christian melancholy and philosophical criticism which we described a moment ago, poetry will take a great step, a decisive step, a step which, like the upheaval of an earthquake, will change the whole face of the intellectual world. It will set about doing as nature does, mingling in its creations — but without confounding them — darkness and light, the grotesque and the sublime; in other words, the body and the soul, the beast and the intellect; for the starting-point of religion is always the starting-point of poetry. All things are connected. Thus, then, we see a principle unknown to the ancients, a new type, introduced in poetry; and as an additional element in anything modifies the whole of the thing, a new form of the art is developed. This type is the grotesque; its new form is comedy. Preface to Cromwell (1827) http://www.bartleby.com/39/41.html

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„it's spring when the world is puddle-wonderful“

—  E.E. Cummings American poet 1894 - 1962
Tulips and Chimneys (1923) "in Just-"

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