„The observer usually will see what his fears and hopes and learning teach him to see. But if he can escape these demands that hold up a mirror to himself, then perhaps some of the implications of the work may be felt. But whatever is seen of felt it should be remembered that for me these paintings had to be something else. It is the price one has to pay for clarity when one’s means are honoured only as an instrument of seduction or assault.“

—  Clyfford Still, Letter to Dorothy Miller February 5, 1952; as quoted in Abstract Expressionism Creators and Critics, edited by Clifford Ross, Abrams Publishers New York 1990, p. 193
Clyfford Still15
American artist 1904 - 1980
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„A man has only one escape from his old self: to see a different self — in the mirror of some woman's eyes.“

—  Clare Boothe Luce American writer, politician, ambassador, journalist and anti-Communist activist 1903 - 1987
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„The artist should not only paint what he sees before him, but also what he sees in himself. If, however, he sees nothing within him, then he should also refrain from painting what he sees before him.“

—  Caspar David Friedrich Swedish painter 1774 - 1840
Context: The artist should not only paint what he sees before him, but also what he sees in himself. If, however, he sees nothing within him, then he should also refrain from painting what he sees before him. Otherwise his pictures will be like those folding screens behind which one expects to find only the sick or the dead. Quote from "The Awe-Struck Witness" in TIME magazine (28 October 1974) http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,908926-1,00.html and in "On the Brink: The Artist and the Seas" by Eldon N. Van Liere in Poetics of the Elements in the Human Condition: The Sea (1985) ed. Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka Variant translations: The artist should not only paint what he sees before him, but also what he sees within him. If, however, he sees nothing within him, then he should also omit to paint that which he sees before him. As quoted in German Romantic Painting (1994) by William Vaughan, p. 68

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„Bosboom has just as anyone else fussed around things [paintings] from time to time to get his money. Only very few people can escape this... It is almost impossible that an artist who doesn't have the gift to work for the market as well, will always have to make good things. Because, when he has no money he has to earn it. And he will have to strain himself. For something he appreciates the least of all. He can never neglect this... The examples you can see everywhere. If you may write something about him [Bosboom] again, I hope you will take this into account too. (translation from the original Dutch, Fons Heijnsbroek)“

—  George Hendrik Breitner Dutch painter and photographer 1857 - 1923
version in original Dutch (citaat van zijn brief aan , in het Nederlands:) Bosboom heeft net zoo goed als een ander wel eens dingen afgepeuterd om aan geld te komen. daar ontsnappen maar heel weinig menschen aan.. .Het is bijna onmogelijk dat een artist die niet de gaaf heeft om tegelijk voor de verkoop te werken altijd heeft goede dingen te maken. omdat hij als hij geen geld heeft het moet verdienen. En hij zich zal moeten inspannen. Voor iets waar hij minst voor voelt. Dat nooit nalaten kan.. .De voorbeelden zijn voor 't grijpen. Als je soms iets over hem mocht schrijven hoop ik dat je dit ook in aanmerking zult nemen. quote of Breitner in a letter to Jan Veth, Amsterdam, Fall 1891; original text in RKD-Archive, The Hague https://rkd.nl/explore/excerpts/80 Jan Veth wrote an memorial on Johannes Bosboom, shortly after Bosboom's death

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„I dimly see that there is something more than what we have seen, than what we have said, than what we have felt to-day. One day, perhaps, she and I will exchange better and richer sayings; and so, in that day, all the sadness will be of some service.“

—  Henri Barbusse French novelist 1873 - 1935
Context: Among some papers on my table I see the poem again which we once found out of doors, the bit of paper escaped from the mysterious hands which wrote on it, and come to the stone seat. It ended by whispering, "Only I know the tears that brimming rise, your beauty blended with your smile to espy." In the days of yore it had made us smile with delight. To-night there are real tears in my eyes. What is it? I dimly see that there is something more than what we have seen, than what we have said, than what we have felt to-day. One day, perhaps, she and I will exchange better and richer sayings; and so, in that day, all the sadness will be of some service.

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„That the consequence of his guilt should he transferred from him to one who is innocent (although that innocent one he himself willing to accept it), whatever else it be, is not justice. We are mocking the word when we call it such.“

—  James Anthony Froude English historian, novelist, biographer, and editor of Fraser's Magazine 1818 - 1894
Context: I will be candid. I believe God is a just God, rewarding and punishing us exactly as we act well or ill. I believe that such reward and punishment follow necessarily from His will as revealed in natural law, as well as in the Bible. I believe that as the highest justice is the highest mercy, so He is a merciful God. That the guilty should suffer the measure of penalty which their guilt has incurred, is justice. What we call mercy is not the remission of this, but rather the remission of the extremity of the sentence attached to the act, when we find something in the nature of the causes which led to the act which lightens the moral guilt of the agent. That each should have his exact due is Just — is the best for himself. That the consequence of his guilt should he transferred from him to one who is innocent (although that innocent one he himself willing to accept it), whatever else it be, is not justice. We are mocking the word when we call it such. If I am to use the word justice in any sense at all which human feeling attaches to it, then to permit such transfer is but infinitely deepening the wrong, and seconding the first fault by greater injustice. I am speaking only of the doctrine of the atonement in its human aspect, and as we are to learn anything from it of the divine nature or of human duty. Letter X

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„The painter should not paint what he sees, but what will be seen.“

—  Paul Valéry French poet, essayist, and philosopher 1871 - 1945
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