„That was the other thing that drew me to India-the language. In high school my Latin teacher taught me Greek unofficially on Monday nights. I loved Greek; I loved the idea that there was another script. And then my Latin teacher told me there was a language that was even older and more interesting than Greek: Sanskrit. So everything started coming together-the art, the literature, the language.“

On the aspect of her studying Sanskrit.
Q&A with Wendy Doniger, the Mircea Eliade Distinguished Service Professor and author of The Hindus

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Wendy Doniger25
American Indologist 1940

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