„Man is a real man, and can live and act manfully in this world, not in the strength of opinions, not according to what he thinks, but according to what he is.“

—  James Anthony Froude, livro The Nemesis of Faith, The Nemesis of Faith (1849), Preface, Second edition (21 June 1849)

Citações relacionadas

„Life becomes the way it is lived; and man may live the way he wants to live when he learns to think what he wants to think.“

—  Christian D. Larson Prolific author of metaphysical and New Thought books 1874 - 1962
Your Forces and How to Use Them (1912), p. 107

Sigmund Freud photo
George Herbert Mead photo

„Man lives in a world of Meaning. What he sees and hears means what he will or might handle.“

—  George Herbert Mead American philosopher, sociologist, and psychologist 1863 - 1931
George Herbert Mead (1926). "The Nature of Aesthetic Experience." International Journal of Ethics, Vol. 36, No. 4 (Jul., 1926), pp. 382-393; p. 382

Confucius photo
Paulo Coelho photo
Georges Clemenceau photo
Willie Dixon photo
William Howard Taft photo

„One of the marvelous things about him is that he is strong enough to force the men who dislike him the most to stand by him. By far he is the strongest man before the people to-day except Roosevelt. I think his greatest fault is his failure to accord credit to anyone for what he may have done. This is a great weakness in any man. I think it was one of the strongest things about Roosevelt. He never tried to minimize what other people did and often exaggerated it.“

—  William Howard Taft American politician, 27th President of the United States (in office from 1909 to 1913) 1857 - 1930
On Charles Evans Hughes, in November 1909, as quoted in Taft and Roosevelt : The intimate letters of Archie Butt (1930) by Archibald Willingham Butt, p. 224; this has sometimes been paraphrased: "Failure to accord credit to anyone for what he may have done is a great weakness in any man."

Махатма Ганди photo

„A man is but the product of his thoughts. What he thinks, he becomes.“

—  Махатма Ганди pre-eminent leader of Indian nationalism during British-ruled India 1869 - 1948
1920s, In Ethical Religion, (Madras: S. Ganesan, 1922), p. 62 http://hdl.handle.net/2027/mdp.39015002732066?urlappend=%3Bseq=66

Albert Einstein photo

„A man should look for what is, and not for what he thinks should be.“

—  Albert Einstein German-born physicist and founder of the theory of relativity 1879 - 1955

Carlos Castaneda photo

„A man of knowledge lives by acting, not by thinking about acting… Thus a man of knowledge sweats and puffs and if one looks at him he is just like an ordinary man, except that the folly of his life is under his control.“

—  Carlos Castaneda Peruvian-American author 1925 - 1998
Carlos Castaneda (1971) Separate Reality: Conversations With Don Juan. p. 85; As cited in: Eugene Dupuis (2001) Time Shift: Managing Time to Create a Life You Love. Ch. 5: Self Management

Thomas Carlyle photo

„No matter how old an individual may be, no matter if he is young or old, if he thinks in accordance with the times he is immortal.“

—  Nnamdi Azikiwe First President of Nigeria 1904 - 1996
Quoted in A Life of Azikiwe by K. A. B. Jones-Quartey (Penguin, 1965), p. 121

Chinmayananda Saraswati photo

„A man-of-wisdom lives in the world, but he is never of the world.“

—  Chinmayananda Saraswati Indian spiritual teacher 1916 - 1993
Quotations from Gurudev’s teachings, Chinmya Mission Chicago

Henry Ford photo
Jack Vance photo

„What a strange and unfamiliar world if everyone were treated according to his deserts!“

—  Jack Vance, Lyonesse Trilogy
Lyonesse Trilogy (1983-1989), Suldrun's Garden (1983), Chapter 25, section 1 (p. 270)

P. D. Ouspensky photo

„To hope to find in the world of causes anything logical from our standpoint is just as useless as to think that the world of things can exist in accordance with the laws of a world of shadows or stereometry according to the laws of planimetry.“

—  P. D. Ouspensky, livro Tertium Organum
Tertium Organum (1912; 1922), Context: The logical formula: A is both A and Not-A, corresponds to the mathematical formula: A magnitude can be greater or less than itself. The absurdity of both these propositions shows that they cannot refer to our world. Of course absurdity, as such, is indeed not an index of the attributes of noumena, but the attributes of noumena will certainly be expressed in what are absurdities to us. To hope to find in the world of causes anything logical from our standpoint is just as useless as to think that the world of things can exist in accordance with the laws of a world of shadows or stereometry according to the laws of planimetry. To master the fundamental principles of higher logic means to master the fundamentals of the understanding of a space of higher dimensions, or of the world of the wondrous. In order to approach to a clear understanding of the relations of the multi-dimensional world, we must free ourselves from all the "idols" of our world, as Bacon calls them, i. e., from all obstacles to correct receptivity and reasoning. Then we shall have taken the most important step toward an inner affinity with the world of the wondrous. Ch. XXI

Charles Sanders Peirce photo

„When a man is about to build a house, what a power of thinking he has to do, before he can safely break ground!“

—  Charles Sanders Peirce American philosopher, logician, mathematician, and scientist 1839 - 1914
The Architecture of Theories (1891), Context: Of the fifty or hundred systems of philosophy that have been advanced at different times of the world's history, perhaps the larger number have been, not so much results of historical evolution, as happy thoughts which have accidently occurred to their authors. An idea which has been found interesting and fruitful has been adopted, developed, and forced to yield explanations of all sorts of phenomena. … The remaining systems of philosophy have been of the nature of reforms, sometimes amounting to radical revolutions, suggested by certain difficulties which have been found to beset systems previouslv in vogue; and such ought certainly to be in large part the motive of any new theory. … When a man is about to build a house, what a power of thinking he has to do, before he can safely break ground! With what pains he has to excogitate the precise wants that are to be supplied. What a study to ascertain the most available and suitable materials, to determine the mode of construction to which those materials are best adapted, and to answer a hundred such questions! Now without riding the metaphor too far, I think we may safely say that the studies preliminary to the construction of a great theory should be at least as deliberate and thorough as those that are preliminary to the building of a dwelling-house.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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