„What thou thyself hatest, do to no man.“

—  Isócrates, Nicocles or the Cyprians, 3.61
Original

ἃ πάσχοντες ὑφʹ ἑτέρων ὀργίζεσθε, ταῦτα τοὺς ἄλλους μὴ ποιεῖτε.

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Isócrates
-436 - -338 a.C.
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