„In order to know men, something must be chanced. Who risks himself of nothing knows nothing.“

Obtido da Wikiquote. Última atualização 3 de Junho de 2021. História
Joseph Joubert photo
Joseph Joubert86
1754 - 1824

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Arthur Machen photo

„We know what happened to those who chanced to meet the Great God Pan, and those who are wise know that all symbols are symbols of something, not of nothing.“

—  Arthur Machen, livro The Great God Pan

Fonte: The Great God Pan (1894), Ch. VII : The Encounter in Soho
Contexto: I can fancy what you saw. Yes; it is horrible enough; but after all, it is an old story, an old mystery played in our day and in dim London streets instead of amidst the vineyards and the olive gardens. We know what happened to those who chanced to meet the Great God Pan, and those who are wise know that all symbols are symbols of something, not of nothing. It was, indeed, an exquisite symbol beneath which men long ago veiled their knowledge of the most awful, most secret forces which lie at the heart of all things; forces before which the souls of men must wither and die and blacken, as their bodies blacken under the electric current. Such forces cannot be named, cannot be spoken, cannot be imagined except under a veil and a symbol, a symbol to the most of us appearing a quaint, poetic fancy, to some a foolish, silly tale. But you and I, at all events, have known something of the terror that may dwell in the secret place of life, manifested under human flesh; that which is without form taking to itself a form. Oh, Austin, how can it be? How is it that the very sunlight does not turn to blackness before this thing, the hard earth melt and boil beneath such a burden?

Paulo Coelho photo
Deborah Moggach photo
Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach photo

„Those who know nothing must believe everything.“

—  Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach Austrian writer 1830 - 1916

Wer nichts weiß, muss alles glauben.
Fonte: Aphorisms (1880/1893), p. 21, Aphorismen, in: Schriften, vol. 1, Paetel, Berlin 1893.

Horatio Nelson photo

„Something must be left to chance; nothing is sure in a sea fight above all.“

—  Horatio Nelson Royal Navy Admiral 1758 - 1805

Before the battle of Trafalgar [citation needed]
The Battle of Trafalgar (1805)

Ford Madox Ford photo
Voltaire photo

„Doctors are men who prescribe medicine of which they know little, to cure diseases of which they know less, for human beings of which they know nothing.“

—  Voltaire French writer, historian, and philosopher 1694 - 1778

Les médecins administrent des médicaments dont ils savent très peu, à des malades dont ils savent moins, pour guérir des maladies dont ils ne savent rien.
This attribution to Voltaire appears in Strauss' Familiar Medical Quotations (1968), p. 394, and in publications as early as 1956 http://books.google.pt/books?id=lCtCAQAAIAAJ&q=%22Doctors+are+men+who+prescribe+medicine+of%22&dq=%22Doctors+are+men+who+prescribe+medicine+of%22&hl=pt-PT&sa=X&ei=mbnWUsvDIfTB7Aaw_YD4Dw&redir_esc=y; the quotation in French does not, however, appear to be original, and is probably a relatively modern invention, only quoted in recent (21st century) published works, which attribute it to "Voltaire" without citing any source.
Attributed

Henry Taylor photo

„The world knows nothing of its greatest men.“

—  Henry Taylor English playwright and poet 1800 - 1886

Act I, sc. 5.
Philip van Artevelde (1834)

Jean Paul Sartre photo

„With despair, true optimism begins: the optimism of the man who expects nothing, who knows he has no rights and nothing coming to him, who rejoices in counting on himself alone and in acting alone for the good of all.“

—  Jean Paul Sartre French existentialist philosopher, playwright, novelist, screenwriter, political activist, biographer, and literary cri… 1905 - 1980

Characterizations of Existentialism (1944)

Tom Clancy photo
Leo Buscaglia photo

„To try is to risk failure, but risks must be taken, because the greatest hazard in life is to risk nothing.“

—  Leo Buscaglia Motivational speaker, writer 1924 - 1998

Living, Loving, and Learning (1982)
Variante: Risks must be taken because the greatest hazard in life is to risk nothing.
Fonte: Living Loving and Learning
Contexto: To love is to risk not being loved in return. To hope is to risk pain. To try is to risk failure, but risks must be taken, because the greatest hazard in life is to risk nothing.

Leo Buscaglia photo
Konrad Lorenz photo
Clive Barker photo
Wallace Stevens photo

„For the listener, who listens in the snow,
And, nothing himself, beholds
Nothing that is not there and the nothing that is.“

—  Wallace Stevens, livro Harmonium

"The Snow Man"
Harmonium (1923)
Contexto: p>One must have a mind of winter
To regard the frost and the boughs
Of the pine-trees crusted with snow;And have been cold a long time
To behold the junipers shagged with ice,
The spruces rough in the distant glitterOf the January sun; and not to think
Of any misery in the sound of the wind,
In the sound of a few leaves,Which is the sound of the land
Full of the same wind
That is blowing in the same bare placeFor the listener, who listens in the snow,
And, nothing himself, beholds
Nothing that is not there and the nothing that is.</p

Michael Faraday photo
John Lancaster Spalding photo

„They who think they know all, learn nothing.“

—  John Lancaster Spalding Catholic bishop 1840 - 1916

Fonte: Aphorisms and Reflections (1901), p. 257

John Stuart Mill photo

„A man who has nothing which he is willing to fight for, nothing which he cares more about than he does about his personal safety, is a miserable creature who has no chance of being free, unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself.“

—  John Stuart Mill British philosopher and political economist 1806 - 1873

"The Contest in America," Fraser’s Magazine (February 1862); later published in Dissertations and Discussions (1868), vol.1 p. 26
Contexto: War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things: the decayed and degraded state of moral and patriotic feeling which thinks that nothing is worth a war, is much worse. When a people are used as mere human instruments for firing cannon or thrusting bayonets, in the service and for the selfish purposes of a master, such war degrades a people. A war to protect other human beings against tyrannical injustice; a war to give victory to their own ideas of right and good, and which is their own war, carried on for an honest purpose by their free choice, — is often the means of their regeneration. A man who has nothing which he is willing to fight for, nothing which he cares more about than he does about his personal safety, is a miserable creature who has no chance of being free, unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself. As long as justice and injustice have not terminated their ever-renewing fight for ascendancy in the affairs of mankind, human beings must be willing, when need is, to do battle for the one against the other.

Tanith Lee photo

„There are two clever tricks men know. One is to make much of nothing. The second is to make nothing of much.“

—  Tanith Lee, livro Vazkor, Son of Vazkor

Book One, Part II “The Warrior”, Chapter 2 (p. 49)
Vazkor, Son of Vazkor (1978)

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