„Although many historians of the new millennium now take issue with the notion of a Scientific Revolution, it is generally agreed that Newton's work culminated the long development of European science, creating a synthesis that opened the way for the scientific culture of the modern age.“

—  John Freely, p. 190
John Freely8
American physicist 1926 - 2017
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„The present revolution of scientific thought follows in natural sequence on the great revolutions at earlier epochs in the history of science“

—  Arthur Stanley Eddington British astrophysicist 1882 - 1944
Context: ... The present revolution of scientific thought follows in natural sequence on the great revolutions at earlier epochs in the history of science. Einstein's special theory of relativity, which explains the indeterminateness of the frame of space and time, crowns the work of Copernicus who first led us to give up our insistence on a geocentric outlook on nature; Einstein's general theory of relativity, which reveals the curvature or non-Euclidean geometry of space and time, carries forward the rudimentary thought of those earlier astronomers who first contemplated the possibility that their existence lay on something which was not flat. These earlier revolutions are still a source of perplexity in childhood, which we soon outgrow; and a time will come when Einstein's amazing revelations have likewise sunk into the commonplaces of educated thought. The Theory of Relativity and its Influence on Scientific Thought (1922), p. 31-32

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„Origami helps in the study of mathematics and science in many ways. … Using origami anyone can become a scientific experimenter with no fuss.“

—  Martin David Kruskal American mathematician 1925 - 2006
at the AAAS meeting: Mathematics and Science of Origami: Visualize the Possibilities, February 15, 2002, as quoted by Science Daily Origami Helps Scientists Solve Problems http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/02/020219080203.htm, February 21, 2002.

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„In science, moreover, the work of the individual is so bound up with that of his scientific predecessors and contemporaries that it appears almost as an impersonal product of his generation.“

—  Albert Einstein German-born physicist and founder of the theory of relativity 1879 - 1955
Context: When a man after long years of searching chances on a thought which discloses something of the beauty of this mysterious universe, he should not therefore be personally celebrated. He is already sufficiently paid by his experience of seeking and finding. In science, moreover, the work of the individual is so bound up with that of his scientific predecessors and contemporaries that it appears almost as an impersonal product of his generation. From the story "The Progress of Science" in The Scientific Monthly edited by J. McKeen Cattell ( June 1921 http://books.google.com/books?id=453muO-6N4kC&pg=PA488-IA1#v=onepage&q&f=false), Vol. XII, No. 6. The story says that the comments were made at the annual meeting of the National Academy of Sciences at the National Museum in Washington on April 25, 26, and 27. Einstein's comments appear on p. 579 http://books.google.com/books?id=453muO-6N4kC&pg=PA579#v=onepage&q&f=false, though the story may be paraphrasing rather than directly quoting since it says "In reply Professor Einstein in substance said" the quote above.

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„This is not yet a scientific age.“

—  Richard Feynman American theoretical physicist 1918 - 1988
Context: Is no one inspired by our present picture of the universe? This value of science remains unsung by singers, you are reduced to hearing not a song or poem, but an evening lecture about it. This is not yet a scientific age.

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