„“The hope of the real and lasting improvement of this present world by our moral endeavour. With lack of this, there would be moral discouragement, and the chief use of this life would be merely to find the means of departing out of it; righteousness could only be "in heaven," — in "the hereafter." This added essential to moral effort Personal Idealism supplies, with assurance of hope, in its indivisible union of the eternal and the temporal worlds; a union in which the eternal is the unitary and governing whole, and the temporal the potentially governed part.”“

—  George Holmes Howison, p.402
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George Holmes Howison135
American philosopher 1834 - 1916
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—  Ludwig Wittgenstein Austrian-British philosopher 1889 - 1951
Context: Death is not an event in life: we do not live to experience death. If we take eternity to mean not infinite temporal duration but timelessness, then eternal life belongs to those who live in the present. Our life has no end in just the way in which our visual field has no limits. (6.4311) Der Tod ist kein Ereignis des Lebens. Den Tod erlebt man nicht. Wenn man unter Ewigkeit nicht unendliche Zeitdauer, sondern Unzeitlichkeit versteht, dann lebt der ewig, der in der Gegenwart lebt. Unser Leben ist ebenso endlos, wie unser Gesichtsfeld grenzenlos ist.

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—  Felix Adler German American professor of political and social ethics, rationalist, and lecturer 1851 - 1933
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—  Friedrich Hayek Austrian and British economist and Nobel Prize for Economics laureate 1899 - 1992
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—  Miguel de Unamuno 19th-20th century Spanish writer and philosopher 1864 - 1936
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—  Edith Wharton American novelist, short story writer, designer 1862 - 1937
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