„... the desolate
Is doubly sorrowful when it recalls
It was not always desolate.“

Change from The London Literary Gazette (3rd January 1829)
The Vow of the Peacock (1835)

Letitia Elizabeth Landon photo
Letitia Elizabeth Landon
poetisa e romancista inglesa 1802 - 1838

Citações relacionadas

Buzz Aldrin photo

„Magnificent desolation.“

—  Buzz Aldrin American astronaut 1930

Words said when he first stepped onto the Moon; Buzz Aldrin and Ken Abraham, Magnificent desolation: The Long Journey Home from the Moon (2009). Random House: p. 33-34.

Hồ Xuân Hương photo

„Praise whoever sketched this desolate scene.“

—  Hồ Xuân Hương Vietnamese poet 1772 - 1822

"Autumn Landscape", line 2
Spring Essence (2000)
Original: (vi) Khen ai khéo vẽ cảnh tiêu sơ.

Jeff VanderMeer photo
Rashi photo
Julian of Norwich photo
Don Paterson photo
Fernando Pessoa photo

„Solitude desolates me; company oppresses me.“

—  Fernando Pessoa, livro Livro do Desassossego

Ibid.
The Book of Disquiet
Original: A solidão desola-me; a companhia oprime-me.

Henri Barbusse photo

„The eye is lost in all directions among the desolation where the multitude of men and women are hiding, as always and as everywhere.“

—  Henri Barbusse French novelist 1873 - 1935

Light (1919), Ch. XXII - Light
Contexto: The eye is lost in all directions among the desolation where the multitude of men and women are hiding, as always and as everywhere.
That is what is. Who will say, "That is what must be!"
I have searched, I have indistinctly seen, I have doubted. Now, I hope.

Francis Scott Key photo

„O thus be it ever, when freemen shall stand
Between their loved home and the war's desolation.“

—  Francis Scott Key American lawyer and poet 1779 - 1843

A line in the final stanzas is comparable to "It made and preserves us a nation" in The Flag of our Union by George Pope Morris.
The Star-Spangled Banner (1814)
Contexto: O say can you see by the dawn's early light,
What so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming,
Whose broad stripes and bright stars through the perilous fight,
O'er the ramparts we watched, were so gallantly streaming?
And the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air,
Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there;
O say does that star-spangled banner yet wave,
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave?On the shore dimly seen through the mists of the deep,
Where the foe's haughty host in dread silence reposes,
What is that which the breeze, o'er the towering steep,
As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses?
Now it catches the gleam of the morning's first beam,
In full glory reflected now shines in the stream:
'Tis the star-spangled banner, O! long may it wave
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave. And where is that band who so vauntingly swore
That the havoc of war and the battle's confusion,
A home and a country, should leave us no more?
Their blood has washed out their foul footsteps' pollution.
No refuge could save the hireling and slave
From the terror of flight, or the gloom of the grave:
And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave,
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave.O thus be it ever, when freemen shall stand
Between their loved home and the war's desolation.
Blest with vict'ry and peace, may the Heav'n rescued land
Praise the Power that hath made and preserved us a nation!
Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just,
And this be our motto: "In God is our trust."
And the star-spangled banner in triumph shall wave
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave!

Haruki Murakami photo
Wallace Stevens photo

„The world about us would be desolate except for the world within us.“

—  Wallace Stevens American poet 1879 - 1955

The Necessary Angel (1951), Imagination as Value

Baruch Spinoza photo

„If slavery, barbarism and desolation are to be called peace, men can have no worse misfortune.“

—  Baruch Spinoza Dutch philosopher 1632 - 1677

Fonte: Political Treatise (1677), Ch. 6, On Monarchy
Contexto: If slavery, barbarism and desolation are to be called peace, men can have no worse misfortune. No doubt there are usually more and sharper quarrels between parents and children, than between masters and slaves; yet it advances not the art of household management to change a father's right into a right of property, and count children but as slaves. Slavery, then, and not peace, is furthered by handing the whole authority to one man.

Wilfrid Scawen Blunt photo
Sarah Helen Whitman photo
Harriet Beecher Stowe photo
Luis Miguel photo

„Solitude is good, desolation is bad. I have experienced both.“

—  Luis Miguel Puerto Rican singer; music producer 1970

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pYH0SnfpuNU
Interview in Mexico, 1995

John Steinbeck photo

„Humanity has been passing through a gray and desolate time of confusion.“

—  John Steinbeck American writer 1902 - 1968

Nobel Prize acceptance speech (1962)
Contexto: Humanity has been passing through a gray and desolate time of confusion. My great predecessor, William Faulkner, speaking here, referred to it as a tragedy of universal fear so long sustained that there were no longer problems of the spirit, so that only the human heart in conflict with itself seemed worth writing about.
Faulkner, more than most men, was aware of human strength as well as of human weakness. He knew that the understanding and the resolution of fear are a large part of the writer's reason for being.
This is not new. The ancient commission of the writer has not changed. He is charged with exposing our many grievous faults and failures, with dredging up to the light our dark and dangerous dreams for the purpose of improvement.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“