„Translation: Every age bears its fruits, it's all in knowing how to harvest them.“

—  Raymond Radiguet, Tout âge porte ses fruits, il faut savoir les cueillir. Raymond Radiguet: Le bal du comte d'Orgel. Paris 1924. P. 15.
Original

Tout âge porte ses fruits, il faut savoir les cueillir.

Raymond Radiguet photo
Raymond Radiguet8
1903 - 1923
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