„Fifty years ago, when Europeans and Americans still distinguished high culture from popular culture, and when classical learning was still highly esteemed in colleges and universities, C. P. Snow delivered his famous Rede Lecture at Cambridge University, "The Two Cultures and the Scientific Revolution." Snow did more than warn of the growing split between the old culture of the humanities and the rising culture of science. He took Britain's literary aristocracy to task for its dangerous dismissal of scientific and technological progress, which Snow believed offered the solutions to the world's deepest problems. In a vitriolic response to Snow, the literary critic F. R. Leavis defended the primacy of the humanities for a civilizing education, insisting that science must not be allowed to operate outside of the moral norms that a first-rate humanistic education alone could provide.“

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Leon R. Kass20
American academic 1939
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—  Alfred de Zayas American United Nations official 1947
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—  Robert M. Pirsig American writer and philosopher 1928
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—  Brian Cox (physicist) English physicist and former musician 1968
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—  Freeman Dyson theoretical physicist and mathematician 1923
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