„There are few things more important in the business of the state, than that the results of inquiry and research should be realised by those who have had the conduct of it.“

—  Henry Taylor, Ch. 25. p. 198
Henry Taylor photo
Henry Taylor33
English playwright and poet 1800 - 1886
Publicidade

Citações relacionadas

Richard Strauss photo
Tim Cook photo

„I don’t think business should only deal in commercial things. Business, to me, is nothing more than a collection of people. If people have values, then companies should.“

—  Tim Cook American business executive 1960
CNBC: "Apple's Tim Cook shares a rule that leaders should live by" https://www.cnbc.com/2018/06/26/apple-ceo-tim-cook-advice-for-leaders-on-speaking-out.html (26 June 2018)

Publicidade
John Locke photo
Thomas Fuller (writer) photo
Edward Jenks photo
Grandma Moses photo

„Painting's not important. The important thing is keeping busy.“

—  Grandma Moses American artist 1860 - 1961
As quoted in New Leaves (1986) by Louise Matteoni

Mohammed Alkobaisi photo
Ursula Goodenough photo
Publicidade
Gore Vidal photo

„Private lives should be no business of the State. The State is bad enough as it is.“

—  Gore Vidal American writer 1925 - 2012
Context: Private lives should be no business of the State. The State is bad enough as it is. It cannot educate or medicate or feed the people; it cannot do anything but kill the people. No State like that do we want prying into our private lives. Quoted in Gert Jonkers, "Gore Vidal, the Fantastic Man," http://www.buttmagazine.com/?p=457 Butt, No. 20 (7 April 2007)

Noam Chomsky photo
Publicidade
John Locke photo

„The necessity of believing without knowledge, nay often upon very slight grounds, in this fleeting state of action and blindness we are in, should make us more busy and careful to inform ourselves than constrain others.“

—  John Locke English philosopher and physician 1632 - 1704
Context: For where is the man that has incontestable evidence of the truth of all that he holds, or of the falsehood of all he condemns; or can say that he has examined to the bottom all his own, or other men's opinions? The necessity of believing without knowledge, nay often upon very slight grounds, in this fleeting state of action and blindness we are in, should make us more busy and careful to inform ourselves than constrain others. At least, those who have not thoroughly examined to the bottom all their own tenets, must confess they are unfit to prescribe to others; and are unreasonable in imposing that as truth on other men's belief, which they themselves have not searched into, nor weighed the arguments of probability, on which they should receive or reject it. Those who have fairly and truly examined, and are thereby got past doubt in all the doctrines they profess and govern themselves by, would have a juster pretence to require others to follow them: but these are so few in number, and find so little reason to be magisterial in their opinions, that nothing insolent and imperious is to be expected from them: and there is reason to think, that, if men were better instructed themselves, they would be less imposing on others. Book IV, Ch. 16, sec. 4

Felix Adler photo

„It is the business of the preacher, not only to state moral truths, but to inspire his hearers with a realising sense of their value, and to awaken in them the desire to act accordingly.“

—  Felix Adler German American professor of political and social ethics, rationalist, and lecturer 1851 - 1933
Context: It is the business of the preacher, not only to state moral truths, but to inspire his hearers with a realising sense of their value, and to awaken in them the desire to act accordingly. He can do this only by putting his own purpose as a yeast into their hearts. The influence of the right sort of preachers cannot be spared. The human race is not yet so far advanced that it can dispense with the impulses that come from men of more than average intensity of moral energy. Let us produce, through the efficacy of a better moral life and of a deeper moral experience, a surer faith in the ultimate victory of the good. Let us found religion upon a basis of perfect intellectual honesty. Religion, if it is to mean anything at all, must stand for the highest truth. How then can the cause of truth be served by the sacrifice, more or less disguised, of one's intellectual convictions?

Próximo