„The Riddle Master himself lost the key to his own riddles one day,” he said in his deep, reed-pure voice, “and he found it again at the bottom of his heart.“

—  Patricia A. McKillip, livro The Forgotten Beasts of Eld

Fonte: The Forgotten Beasts of Eld (1974), Chapter 11, pp. 311-312.

Última atualização 4 de Junho de 2020. História
Patricia A. McKillip photo
Patricia A. McKillip30
American fantasy writer 1948

Citações relacionadas

Washington Irving photo
Edgar Guest photo
Karen Marie Moning photo
Confucius photo

„The superior man examines his heart, that there may be nothing wrong there, and that he may have no cause for dissatisfaction with himself.“

—  Confucius Chinese teacher, editor, politician, and philosopher -551 - -479 a.C.

The Analects, The Doctrine of the Mean
Contexto: The superior man examines his heart, that there may be nothing wrong there, and that he may have no cause for dissatisfaction with himself. That wherein the superior man cannot be equaled is simply this — his work which other men cannot see.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe photo
Gustave Flaubert photo
Oliver Goldsmith photo

„A kind and gentle heart he had,
To comfort friends and foes;
The naked every day he clad
When he put on his clothes.“

—  Oliver Goldsmith, livro The Vicar of Wakefield

Fonte: The Vicar of Wakefield (1766), Ch. 17, An Elegy on the Death of a Mad Dog, st. 3.

Paul Deussen photo

„Smooth are his words, his voice as honey sweet,
Yet war is in his heart, and dark deceit!“

—  Moschus Ancient Greek poet

'The Stray Cupid', tr. R. Polwhele, lines 14–15
Compare: "The words of his mouth were smoother than butter, but war was in his heart: his words were softer than oil, yet were they drawn swords." Psalm 55:21 (KJV)
Idyllium I

John Tyndall photo

„Faraday was not slow to anger, but he completely ruled his own spirit, and thus, though he took no cities, he captivated all hearts.“

—  John Tyndall British scientist 1820 - 1893

"Points of Character", p. 37.
Faraday as a Discoverer (1868)
Contexto: A point highly illustrative of the character of Faraday now comes into view. He gave an account of his discovery of Magneto-electricity in a letter to his friend M. Hachette, of Paris, who communicated the letter to the Academy of Sciences. The letter was translated and published; and immediately afterwards two distinguished Italian philosophers took up the subject, made numerous experiments, and published their results before the complete memoirs of Faraday had met the public eye. This evidently irritated him. He reprinted the paper of the learned Italians in the Philosophical Magazine accompanied by sharp critical notes from himself. He also wrote a letter dated Dec. 1,1832, to Gay Lussac, who was then one of the editors of the Annales de Chimie in which he analysed the results of the Italian philosophers, pointing out their errors, and' defending himself from what he regarded as imputations on his character. The style of this letter is unexceptionable, for Faraday could not write otherwise than as a gentleman; but the letter shows that had he willed it he could have hit hard. We have heard much of Faraday's gentleness and sweetness and tenderness. It is all true, but it is very incomplete. You cannot resolve a powerful nature into these elements, and Faraday's character would have been less admirable than it was had it not embraced forces and tendencies to which the silky adjectives "gentle" and "tender" would by no means apply. Underneath his sweetness and gentleness was the heat of a volcano. He was a man of excitable and fiery nature; but through high self-discipline he had converted the fire into a central glow and motive power of life, instead of permitting it to waste itself in useless passion. "He that is slow to anger" saith the sage, "is greater than the mighty, and he that ruleth his own spirit than he that taketh a city." Faraday was not slow to anger, but he completely ruled his own spirit, and thus, though he took no cities, he captivated all hearts.

Cormac McCarthy photo
Francis Bacon photo
Cassandra Clare photo
Max Lucado photo
Teal Swan photo
Charles Dibdin photo