„Experiments are the only means of knowledge at our disposal. The rest is poetry, imagination.“

—  Max Planck

As quoted in Advances in Biochemical Psychopharmacology, Vol. 25 (1980), p. 3

Última atualização 22 de Maio de 2020. História
Max Planck photo
Max Planck6
professor académico alemão 1858 - 1947

Citações relacionadas

Amir Taheri photo

„Poetry interprets the chaos of human life and tries to bestow meaning on it. Without imagination there could be no poetry; and imagination chained by ideology produces only propaganda.“

—  Amir Taheri Iranian journalist 1942

When the Ayatollah Dictates Poetry http://www.aawsat.net/2015/07/article55344336/when-the-ayatollah-dictates-poetry, Ashraq Al-Awsat (Jul 11, 2015).

Allen Ginsberg photo
Lawrence Ferlinghetti photo

„Poetry is the shadow cast by our imaginations.“

—  Lawrence Ferlinghetti American artist, writer and activist 1919

These Are My Rivers: New & Selected Poems, 1955-1993 (New Directions) ISBN: 0-0112-1273-4 0-0112-1252-1

Immanuel Kant photo

„But though all our knowledge begins with experience, it by no means follows, that all arises out of experience.“

—  Immanuel Kant, livro Crítica da Razão Pura

Introduction I. Of the Difference Between Pure and Empirical Knowledge
Critique of Pure Reason (1781; 1787)
Variante: That all our knowledge begins with experience there can be no doubt.
Contexto: That all our knowledge begins with experience there can be no doubt. For how is it possible that the faculty of cognition should be awakened into exercise otherwise than by means of objects which affect our senses, and partly of them selves produce representations, partly rouse our powers of understanding into activity, to compare, to connect, or to separate these, and so to convert the raw material of our sensuous impressions into a knowledge of objects, which is called experience? In respect of time, therefore, no knowledge of ours is antecedent to experience, but begins with it. But though all our knowledge begins with experience, it by no means follows, that all arises out of experience. For, on the contrary, it is quite possible that our empirical knowledge is a compound of that which we receive through impressions, and that which the faculty of cognition supplies from itself (sensuous impressions giving merely the occasion)... It is, therefore, a question which requires close investigation, and is not to be answered at first sight,—whether there exists a knowledge altogether independent of experience, and even of all sensuous impressions? Knowledge of this kind is called à priori, in contradistinction to empirical knowledge which has its sources à posteriori, that is, in experience.

Albert Einstein photo

„Information is not knowledge. The only source of knowledge is experience.“

—  Albert Einstein German-born physicist and founder of the theory of relativity 1879 - 1955

According to Barbara Wolff, of The Hebrew University's Albert Einstein Archives, this is not one of Einstein's identifiable quotations. (Source: paralegalpie.com http://www.paralegalpie.com/paralegalpie/2009/11/did-anybody-really-say-that.html.)
The phrase "the only source of knowledge is experience" is found in an English-language essay from 1896: "We can only be guided by what we know, and our only source of knowledge is experience" (Arthur J. Pillsbury, "The Final Word" https://books.google.com/books?id=Mw9IAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA595&dq=%22only+source", Overland Monthly, November 1896). The thought can be seen as a paraphrase of John Locke's argument from his Essay Concerning Human Understanding: "Whence has it [the Mind] all the materials of Reason and Knowledge? To this I answer, in one Word, From Experience". (Locke, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding/Book II/Chapter I, 2.)
The phrase "information is not knowledge" is also found from the nineteenth century https://books.google.com/books?id=W2oAAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA59&dq=%22information+is+not+knowledge%22.
Misattributed

D.H. Lawrence photo

„God is only a great imaginative experience.“

—  D.H. Lawrence English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, literary critic and painter 1885 - 1930

Phoenix: The Posthumous Papers of D. H. Lawrence, pt. 4, ed. by E. McDonald, (1936)

Wallace Stevens photo

„The best definition of true imagination is that it is the sum of our faculties. Poetry is the scholar's art.“

—  Wallace Stevens American poet 1879 - 1955

The Necessary Angel (1951), Imagination as Value
Contexto: The best definition of true imagination is that it is the sum of our faculties. Poetry is the scholar's art. The acute intelligence of the imagination, the illimitable resources of its memory, its power to possess the moment it perceives — if we were speaking of light itself, and thinking of the relationship between objects and light, no further demonstration would be necessary... What light requires a day to do, and by day I mean a kind of Biblical revolution of time, the imagination does in the twinkling of an eye. It colors, increases, brings to a beginning and end, invents languages, crushes men, and, for that matter, gods in its hands, it says to women more than it is possible to say, it rescues all of us from what we have called absolute fact...

David Hume photo
U.G. Krishnamurti photo

„Our mind (and there are no individual minds — only "mind", which is the accumulation of man's knowledge and experience) has created the notion of the psyche and evolution.“

—  U.G. Krishnamurti, livro Mind is a Myth

Fonte: Mind is a Myth (1987), Ch. 1: The Certainty That Blasts Everything
Contexto: Our mind (and there are no individual minds — only "mind", which is the accumulation of man's knowledge and experience) has created the notion of the psyche and evolution. Only technology progresses, while we as a race are moving closer to complete and total destruction of the world and ourselves. Everything in man's consciousness is pushing the whole world, which nature has so laboriously created, toward destruction. There has been no qualitative change in man's thinking; we feel about our neighbours just as the frightened caveman felt towards his. The only thing that has changed is our ability to destroy our neighbor and his property.

Elbert Hubbard photo

„Knowledge is the distilled essence of our intuitions, corroborated by experience.“

—  Elbert Hubbard American writer, publisher, artist, and philosopher fue el escritor del jarron azul 1856 - 1915

Immanuel Kant photo

„All our knowledge falls with the bounds of experience.“

—  Immanuel Kant, livro Crítica da Razão Pura

A 146, B 185
Critique of Pure Reason (1781; 1787)

Florence Nightingale photo

„Poetry and imagination begin life.“

—  Florence Nightingale English social reformer and statistician, and the founder of modern nursing 1820 - 1910

Cassandra (1860)
Contexto: Poetry and imagination begin life. A child will fall on its knees on the gravel walk at the sight of a pink hawthorn in full flower, when it is by itself, to praise God for it.

Arthur Schopenhauer photo

„The fundament upon which all our knowledge and learning rests is the inexplicable.“

—  Arthur Schopenhauer, livro Parerga e Paralipomena

Vol. 2, Ch. 1, § 1
Parerga and Paralipomena (1851), Counsels and Maxims

George Eliot photo

„Poetry and art and knowledge are sacred and pure.“

—  George Eliot, livro The Mill on the Floss

Fonte: The Mill on the Floss

John Theophilus Desaguliers photo

„All the knowledge we have of nature depends upon facts; for without observations and experiments our natural philosophy would only be a science of terms and an unintelligible jargon.“

—  John Theophilus Desaguliers French-born British natural philosopher and clergyman 1683 - 1744

Fonte: Course of Experimental Philosophy, 1745, p. v: Preface
Contexto: All the knowledge we have of nature depends upon facts; for without observations and experiments our natural philosophy would only be a science of terms and an unintelligible jargon. But then we must call in Geometry and Arithmetics, to our Assistance, unless we are willing to content ourselves with natural History and conjectural Philosophy. For, as many causes concur in the production of compound effects, we are liable to mistake the predominant cause, unless we can measure the quantity and the effect produced, compare them with, and distinguish them from, each other, to find out the adequate cause of each single effect, and what must be the result of their joint action.

Marianne Moore photo

„Music should be directed by the ear, poetry by the imagination“

—  Marianne Moore American poet and writer 1887 - 1972

Review -Jean Gaingne -New & Selected Poems 1967
Prose

Haruki Murakami photo

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“