„Even in earliest youth my fondest desire was to understand Nature, and thus to come closer to the truth; a truth that I was unable to discover either at school or in church.“

Jane Cobbald: Viktor Schauberger - A Life of Learning from Nature (2006)

Viktor Schauberger photo
Viktor Schauberger54
austrian philosopher and inventor 1885 - 1958

Citações relacionadas

Galileo Galilei photo

„All truths are easy to understand once they are discovered; the point is to discover them.“

—  Galileo Galilei Italian mathematician, physicist, philosopher and astronomer 1564 - 1642

As quoted in Angels in the workplace: stories and inspirations for creating a new world of work (1999) by Melissa Giovagnoli
Attributed

Alfred, Lord Tennyson photo

„Thus truth was multiplied on truth“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Lady Clara Vere de Vere

The Poet (1830)
Contexto: p>Thus truth was multiplied on truth, the world
Like one great garden show'd,
And thro' the wreaths of floating dark up-curl'd,
Rare sunrise flow'dAnd Freedom rear'd in that august sunrise
Her beautiful bold brow,
When rites and forms before his burning eyes
Melted like snow.</p

Tupac Shakur photo

„Accept no substitutes; I bring truth to the youth.“

—  Tupac Shakur rapper and actor 1971 - 1996

"Holla If Ya Hear Me" http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/2pac/hollaifyahearme.html (1993).
1990s

John Hancock photo

„I have always, from my earliest youth, rejoiced in the felicity of my fellow-men“

—  John Hancock American Patriot and statesman during the American Revolution (1737–1793) 1737 - 1793

Boston Massacre Oration (1774)
Contexto: I have always, from my earliest youth, rejoiced in the felicity of my fellow-men; and have ever considered it as the indispensable able duty of every member of society to promote, as far as in him lies, the prosperity of every individual, but more especially of the community to which he belongs; and also, as a faithful subject of the State, to use his utmost endeavors to detect, and having detected, strenuously to oppose every traitorous plot which its enemies may devise for its destruction. Security to the persons and properties of the governed is so obviously the design and end of civil government, that to attempt a logical proof of it would be like burning tapers at noonday, to assist the sun in enlightening the world; and it cannot be either virtuous or honorable to attempt to support a government of which this is not the great and principal basis; and it is to the last degree vicious and infamous to attempt to support a government which manifestly tends to render the persons and properties of the governed insecure. Some boast of being friends to government; I am a friend to righteous government, to a government founded upon the principles of reason and justice; but I glory in publicly avowing my eternal enmity to tyranny.

Peter Abelard photo

„There are many seeming contradictions and even obscurities in the innumerable writings of the church fathers. Our respect for their authority should not stand in the way of an effort on our part to come at the truth.“

—  Peter Abelard, Sic et non

Prologue as translated in Readings in European History, Vol. I (1904) edited by James Harvey Robinson, p. 450
Sic et Non (1120)
Contexto: There are many seeming contradictions and even obscurities in the innumerable writings of the church fathers. Our respect for their authority should not stand in the way of an effort on our part to come at the truth. The obscurity and contradictions in ancient writings may be explained upon many grounds, and may be discussed without impugning the good faith and insight of the fathers. A writer may use different terms to mean the same thing, in order to avoid a monotonous repetition of the same word. Common, vague words may be employed in order that the common people may understand; and sometimes a writer sacrifices perfect accuracy in the interest of a clear general statement. Poetical, figurative language is often obscure and vague.
Not infrequently apocryphal works are attributed to the saints. Then, even the best authors often introduce the erroneous views of others and leave the reader to distinguish between the true and the false. Sometimes, as Augustine confesses in his own case, the fathers ventured to rely upon the opinions of others.

Czeslaw Milosz photo

„But precisely because such an analysis of history comes closer to the truth, it is more dangerous. It gives the illusion of full knowledge“

—  Czeslaw Milosz, livro The Captive Mind

The Captive Mind (1953)
Contexto: Undoubtedly, one comes closer to the truth when one sees history as the expression of the class struggle rather than a series of private quarrels among kings and nobles. But precisely because such an analysis of history comes closer to the truth, it is more dangerous. It gives the illusion of full knowledge; it supplies answers to all questions, answers which merely run around in a circle repeating a few formulas.

Ray Kurzweil photo
Martin Niemöller photo

„For politicians truth and falsehood are unimportant. So I never could become a politician — not even a church politician.“

—  Martin Niemöller German anti-Nazi theologian and Lutheran pastor 1892 - 1984

As quoted in Martin Niemöller, 1892-1984 (1984) by James Bentley, p. 223

Paul of Tarsus photo

„Who desires all people to be saved and come to full knowledge of the truth.“

—  Paul of Tarsus, livro First Epistle to Timothy

1 Timothy 2:4 (as quoted in World English Bible http://biblehub.com/web/1_timothy/2.htm)
First Epistle to Timothy

Pearl S.  Buck photo

„I became mentally bifocal, and so I learned early to understand that there is no such condition in human affairs as absolute truth. There is only truth as people see it, and truth, even in fact, may be kaleidoscopic in its variety.“

—  Pearl S. Buck American writer 1892 - 1973

Fonte: My Several Worlds (1954), p. 52
Contexto: I became mentally bifocal, and so I learned early to understand that there is no such condition in human affairs as absolute truth. There is only truth as people see it, and truth, even in fact, may be kaleidoscopic in its variety. The damage such perception did to me I have felt ever since, although damage may be too dark a word, for it merely meant that I could never belong entirely to one side of any question. To be a Communist would be absurd to me, as absurd as to be entirely anything and equally impossible. I straddled the globe too young.

Christine O'Donnell photo
Percy Bysshe Shelley photo

„Thus let thy power, which like the truth
Of nature on my passive youth
Descended, to my onward life supply
Its calm, to one who worships thee,
And every form containing thee,
Whom, SPIRIT fair, thy spells did bind
To fear himself, and love all human kind.“

—  Percy Bysshe Shelley English Romantic poet 1792 - 1822

St. 7
Hymn to Intellectual Beauty (1816)
Contexto: The day becomes more solemn and serene
When noon is past; there is a harmony
In autumn, and a lustre in its sky,
Which through the summer is not heard or seen,
As if it could not be, as if it had not been!
Thus let thy power, which like the truth
Of nature on my passive youth
Descended, to my onward life supply
Its calm, to one who worships thee,
And every form containing thee,
Whom, SPIRIT fair, thy spells did bind
To fear himself, and love all human kind.

Zoroaster photo
Catherine of Genoa photo
H.L. Mencken photo

„The profoundest truths of the Middle Ages are now laughed at by schoolboys. The profoundest truths of democracy will be laughed at, a few centuries hence, even by school-teachers.“

—  H.L. Mencken American journalist and writer 1880 - 1956

Fonte: 1920s, Prejudices, Third Series (1922), Ch. 3 "Footnote on Criticism", pp. 85-104
Contexto: Truth, indeed, is something that is believed in completely only by persons who have never tried personally to pursue it to its fastness and grab it by the tail. It is the adoration of second-rate men — men who always receive it as second-hand. Pedagogues believe in immutable truths and spend their lives trying to determine them and propagate them; the intellectual progress of man consists largely of a concerted effort to block and destroy their enterprise. Nine times out of ten, in the arts as in life, there is actually no truth to be discovered; there is only error to be exposed. In whole departments of human inquiry it seems to me quite unlikely that the truth ever will be discovered. Nevertheless, the rubber-stamp thinking of the world always makes the assumption that the exposure of an error is identical with the discovery of truth — that error and truth are simply opposites. They are nothing of the sort. What the world turns to, when it has been cured of one error, is usually simply another error, and maybe one worse than the first one. This is the whole history of the intellect in brief. The average man of today does not believe in precisely the same imbecilities that the Greek of the Fourth Century before Christ believed in, but the things that he does believe in are often quite as idiotic.
Perhaps this statement is a bit too sweeping. There is, year by year, a gradual accumulation of what may be called, provisionally, truths — there is a slow accretion of ideas that somehow manage to meet all practicable human tests, and so survive. But even so, it is risky to call them absolute truths. All that one may safely say of them is that no one, as yet, has demonstrated that they are errors. Soon or late, if experience teaches us anything, they are likely to succumb too. The profoundest truths of the Middle Ages are now laughed at by schoolboys. The profoundest truths of democracy will be laughed at, a few centuries hence, even by school-teachers.

Karl Kraus photo

„An aphorism can never be the whole truth; it is either a half-truth or a truth-and-a-half.“

—  Karl Kraus Czech playwright and publicist 1874 - 1936

Die Fackel no. 270/71 (19 January 1909)
Die Fackel

Robert Cecil, 1st Viscount Cecil of Chelwood photo

„I was brought up from my earliest youth to believe in the enormous importance of peace.“

—  Robert Cecil, 1st Viscount Cecil of Chelwood lawyer, politician and diplomat in the United Kingdom 1864 - 1958

The Future of Civilization (1938)
Contexto: I was brought up from my earliest youth to believe in the enormous importance of peace. I have often heard my father, the late Lord Salisbury, say that, though he did not see how it was possible under the then existing circumstances to avoid wars altogether, yet he had never been able to satisfy himself that they were in principle morally defensible.
Indeed, particularly in the latter part of his life, he made more than one speech in which he expressed the hope that, by some international combination, wars could in the future be prevented. He did not hesitate to express his belief that some such organization as we have since then attempted and erected in the League of Nations might furnish the solution of what he conceived to be the terrific evil of war.

Laxmi Prasad Devkota photo
Leo Tolstoy photo

„In the upper, rich, more educated classes of European society doubt arose as to the truth of that understanding of life which was expressed by Church Christianity.“

—  Leo Tolstoy Russian writer 1828 - 1910

What is Art? (1897)
Contexto: In the upper, rich, more educated classes of European society doubt arose as to the truth of that understanding of life which was expressed by Church Christianity. When, after the Crusades and the maximum development of papal power and its abuses, people of the rich classes became acquainted with the wisdom of the classics and saw, on the one hand, the reasonable lucidity of the teachings of the ancient sages, and on the other hand, the incompatibility of the Church doctrine with the teaching of Christ, they found it impossible to continue to believe the Church teaching.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“