„Who can believe that all these mighty works
Have grown, unaided by the hand of God,
From small beginnings? that the law is blind
by which the world was made?“

—  Marcus Manilius, Astronomica, Astronomica, Quis credat tantas operum sine numine moles Ex minimis, caecoque creatum foedere mundum? Book I, line 492, as reported in Dictionary of Quotations (classical) (1897) by T. B. Harbottle, p. 240.
Original

Quis credat tantas operum sine numine moles Ex minimis, caecoque creatum foedere mundum?

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