„A man that does not aim at raising to himself a great name, will never perform any great actions. And such as go carelessly on in the road of their professions suffer all the fatigues, without acquiring either the honour or recompense that naturally attend it.“

Fonte: A Mother's Advice to Her Son, 1726, p. 137

Obtido da Wikiquote. Última atualização 3 de Junho de 2021. História

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„No man has a capacity for virtue who sacrifices honour for gain. Fortune is powerless to help one who does not exert himself. That man becomes happy who follows Christ. There is no perfect gift without great suffering. Our triumphs and our pomps pass away;“

—  Leonardo Da Vinci Italian Renaissance polymath 1452 - 1519

Fonte: I Philosophy, p. 91
Contexto: He who suffers time to slip away and does not grow in virtue the more one thinks about him the sadder one becomes. No man has a capacity for virtue who sacrifices honour for gain. Fortune is powerless to help one who does not exert himself. That man becomes happy who follows Christ. There is no perfect gift without great suffering. Our triumphs and our pomps pass away; gluttony and sloth and enervating luxury have banished every virtue from the world; so that as it were wandering from its course our nature is subdued by habit. Now and henceforth it is meet that you cure yourself of laziness. The Master has said that sitting on down or lying under the quilts will not bring thee to fame. He who without it has frittered life away leaves no more trace of himself upon the earth than smoke does in the air or the foam on the water.

Herbert Spencer photo

„The great aim of education is not knowledge but action.“

—  Herbert Spencer English philosopher, biologist, sociologist, and prominent classical liberal political theorist 1820 - 1903

Joseph Strutt photo
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„A mere copier of nature can never produce any thing great, can never raise and enlarge the conceptions, or warm the heart of the spectator.“

—  Joshua Reynolds English painter, specialising in portraits 1723 - 1792

Discourse no. 3, delivered on December 14, 1770; vol. 1, p. 52.
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„All political action aims at either preservation or change.“

—  Leo Strauss Classical philosophy specialist and father of neoconservativism 1899 - 1973

"What Is Political Philosophy" in The Journal of Politics, 19(3) (Aug. 1957) by the Southern Political Science Association, p. 343
Contexto: All political action aims at either preservation or change. When desiring to preserve, we wish to prevent a change for the worse; when desiring to change, we wish to bring about something better. All political action is then guided by some thought of better or worse.

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„He flattered himself on being a man without any prejudices; and this pretension itself is a very great prejudice.“

—  Anatole France, livro The Crime of Sylvestre Bonnard

Il se flattait d'être sans préjugés, et cette prétention était à elle seule un gros préjugé.
Pt. II, ch. 4
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„A man who had never known suffering, either in greater or less degree, would scarcely possess consciousness of himself.“

—  Miguel de Unamuno 19th-20th century Spanish writer and philosopher 1864 - 1936

The Tragic Sense of Life (1913), IX : Faith, Hope, and Charity
Contexto: Suffering is a spiritual thing. It is the most immediate revelation of consciousness, and it may be that our body was given us simply in order that suffering might be enabled to manifest itself. A man who had never known suffering, either in greater or less degree, would scarcely possess consciousness of himself. The child first cries at birth when the air, entering into his lungs and limiting him, seems to say to him: You have to breathe me in order to live!

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„Be Good, Do Good.
Do thou always without attachment perform action which should be done, for by performing action without attachment, man reaches the Supreme.“

—  Swami Sivananda Indian philosopher 1887 - 1963

Light, Power and Wisdom (1959), p. 6; note that the short phrase "Be good, do good" had occurred in spiritual teachings of others in the 19th century, usually in conjunction with other injunctions. "Be Good, Do Good" became a prominent motto of the Divine Life Society.
Light, Power and Wisdom (1959), p. 207
Variante: Be good, do good, be kind, be compassionate.

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„In fluxus there has never been any attempt to agree on aims or methods; individuals with something unnameable in common have simply naturally coalesced to publish and perform their work.“

—  George Brecht American artist and composer 1926 - 2008

George Brecht (1963), cited in: Hannah Higgins (2002), Fluxus Experience. p. 69
Contexto: The misunderstandings have seemed to come from comparing fluxus with movements or groups whose individuals ‘have had some principle in common, or an agreed-upon program. In fluxus there has never been any attempt to agree on aims or methods; individuals with something unnameable in common have simply naturally coalesced to publish and perform their work. Perhaps this common something is a feeling that the bounds of art are much wider than they have conventionally seemed, or that art and certain long-established bounds are no longer very useful. At any rate, individuals in europe, the us, and japan have discovered each other’s work and found it nourishing (or something) and have grown objects and events which are original, and often uncategorizable, in a strange new way.

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„It is a great mortification to the vanity of man, that his utmost art and industry can never equal the meanest of nature's productions, either for beauty or value.“

—  David Hume, livro Essays, Moral, Political, and Literary

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Essays, Moral, Political, and Literary (1741-2; 1748)
Contexto: It is a great mortification to the vanity of man, that his utmost art and industry can never equal the meanest of nature's productions, either for beauty or value. Art is only the under-workman, and is employed to give a few strokes of embellishment to those pieces, which come from the hand of the master

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„No Americans are devoid of a yearning desire to rise, but hardly any appear to entertain hopes of great magnitude or to pursue very lofty aims. All are constantly seeking to acquire property, power, and reputation.“

—  Alexis De Tocqueville, livro Da Democracia na América

Book Three, Chapter XIX.
Democracy in America, Volume II (1840), Book Two
Contexto: The First thing that strikes a traveler in the United States is the innumerable multitude of those who seek to emerge from their original condition; and the second is the rarity of lofty ambition to be observed in the midst of the universally ambitious stir of society. No Americans are devoid of a yearning desire to rise, but hardly any appear to entertain hopes of great magnitude or to pursue very lofty aims. All are constantly seeking to acquire property, power, and reputation.

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„The greatest greatness and the greatest humility go hand in hand naturally and without effort.“

—  Meher Baba Indian mystic 1894 - 1969

Contexto: Better the absence of greatness than the establishing of a false greatness by assumed humility. Not only do these efforts at humility on man's part not express strength, they are, on the contrary, expressions of modesty born of weakness, which springs from a lack of knowledge of the truth of Reality.
Beware of modesty. Modesty, under the cloak of humility, invariably leads one into the clutches of self-deception. Modesty breeds egoism, and man eventually succumbs to pride through assumed humility.
The greatest greatness and the greatest humility go hand in hand naturally and without effort.

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„Many writers lay very great stress upon some definite moral purpose, at which they profess to aim their works.“

—  Nathaniel Hawthorne, livro The House of the Seven Gables

Preface
The House of the Seven Gables (1851)
Contexto: Many writers lay very great stress upon some definite moral purpose, at which they profess to aim their works. Not to be deficient in this particular, the author has provided himself with a moral, — the truth, namely, that the wrong-doing of one generation lives into the successive ones, and, divesting itself of every temporary advantage, becomes a pure and uncontrollable mischief; and he would feel it a singular gratification if this romance might effectually convince mankind — or, indeed, any one man — of the folly of tumbling down an avalanche of ill-gotten gold, or real estate, on the heads of an unfortunate posterity, thereby to maim and crush them, until the accumulated mass shall be scattered abroad in its original atoms. In good faith, however, he is not sufficiently imaginative to flatter himself with the slightest hope of this kind. When romances do really teach anything, or produce any effective operation, it is usually through a far more subtile process than the ostensible one. The author has considered it hardly worth his while, therefore, relentlessly to impale the story with its moral as with an iron rod, — or, rather, as by sticking a pin through a butterfly, — thus at once depriving it of life, and causing it to stiffen in an ungainly and unnatural attitude. A high truth, indeed, fairly, finely, and skilfully wrought out, brightening at every step, and crowning the final development of a work of fiction, may add an artistic glory, but is never any truer, and seldom any more evident, at the last page than at the first.

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„[The Vijayanagar kings allowed] that every man may come and go, and live according to his own creed without suffering any annoyance, and without enquiring whether he is a Christian, Jew, Moor or Heathen. Great equity and justice is observed by all.“

—  Duarte Barbosa Portuguese explorer and writer 1480 - 1545

The Book of Duarte Barbosa, vol. I, p. 202. quoted from Lal, K. S. (1999). Theory and practice of Muslim state in India. New Delhi: Aditya Prakashan. Chapter 2

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„Go, raise great Troy by prowess to the Skies.“

—  John Ogilby Scottish academic 1600 - 1676

The Works of Publius Virgilius Maro (2nd ed. 1654), Virgil's Æneis

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