„Personal injury is a more serious matter than damage to property.“

Reg. v. Heppinstale (1859), 7 W. R. 178.

Sir Alexander Cockburn, 12th Baronet photo
Sir Alexander Cockburn, 12th Baronet13
Lord Chief Justice 1802 - 1880

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John Holt (Lord Chief Justice) photo
Jimmy Carter photo
James P. Gray photo

„The war on drugs has done considerable damage to the fourth amendment and that something is very wrong indeed when a person gets a longer sentence for marijuana than for espionage.“

—  James P. Gray American judge 1945

Arnold S. Trebach, Fatal Distraction: The War on Drugs in the Age of Islamic Terrorism, Bloomington, Indiana, Unlimited Publishing LLC (2006) p. 74

Hermann Hesse photo

„For although in a certain sense and for light-minded persons non-existent things can be more easily and irresponsibly represented in words than existing things, for the serious and conscientious historian it is just the reverse.“

—  Hermann Hesse, livro The Glass Bead Game

Motto of the work written by Hesse, and attributed to an "Albertus Secundus"
The Glass Bead Game (1943)
Contexto: For although in a certain sense and for light-minded persons non-existent things can be more easily and irresponsibly represented in words than existing things, for the serious and conscientious historian it is just the reverse. Nothing is harder, yet nothing is more necessary, than to speak of certain things whose existence is neither demonstrable nor probable. The very fact that serious and conscientious men treat them as existing things brings them a step closer to existence and to the possibility of being born.

Sandra Day O'Connor photo
Nicholas Sparks photo
William Howard Taft photo
Nathaniel Lindley, Baron Lindley photo
Frédéric Bastiat photo
Oscar Wilde photo

„Art is the only serious thing in the world. And the artist is the only person who is never serious.“

—  Oscar Wilde Irish writer and poet 1854 - 1900

A Few Maxims for the Instruction of the Over-Educated (1894)

John Green photo
Aldous Huxley photo

„We talk about "mere matters of words" in a tone which implies that we regard words as things beneath the notice of a serious-minded person.
This is a most unfortunate attitude.“

—  Aldous Huxley English writer 1894 - 1963

Quoted as the opening passage of "BOOK ONE: The Functions of Language" in Language in Thought and Action (1949) by S. I. Hayakawa, p. 3
Words and Their Meanings (1940)
Contexto: A great deal of attention has been paid … to the technical languages in which men of science do their specialized thinking … But the colloquial usages of everyday speech, the literary and philosophical dialects in which men do their thinking about the problems of morals, politics, religion and psychology — these have been strangely neglected. We talk about "mere matters of words" in a tone which implies that we regard words as things beneath the notice of a serious-minded person.
This is a most unfortunate attitude. For the fact is that words play an enormous part in our lives and are therefore deserving of the closest study. The old idea that words possess magical powers is false; but its falsity is the distortion of a very important truth. Words do have a magical effect — but not in the way that magicians supposed, and not on the objects they were trying to influence. Words are magical in the way they affect the minds of those who use them. "A mere matter of words," we say contemptuously, forgetting that words have power to mould men's thinking, to canalize their feeling, to direct their willing and acting. Conduct and character are largely determined by the nature of the words we currently use to discuss ourselves and the world around us.

Lewis H. Lapham photo

„By the word "liberty" they meant liberty for property, not liberty for persons.“

—  Lewis H. Lapham American journalist 1935

Fonte: Money And Class In America (1989), Chapter 2, Protocols of Wealth, p. 33

Eduard Bernstein photo
Sallustius photo

„Just as it happens that the Sun, which is good for all, may be injurious to persons with ophthalmia or fever.“

—  Sallustius Roman philosopher and writer

IX. On Providence, Fate, and Fortune.
On the Gods and the Cosmos
Contexto: To believe that human things, especially their material constitution, are ordered not only by celestial beings but by the celestial bodies is a reasonable and true belief. Reason shows that health and sickness, good fortune and bad fortune, arise according to our deserts from that source. But to attribute men's acts of injustice and lust to fate, is to make ourselves good and the Gods bad. Unless by chance a man meant by such a statement that in general all things are for the good of the world and for those who are in a natural state, but that bad education or weakness of nature changes the goods of Fate for the worse. Just as it happens that the Sun, which is good for all, may be injurious to persons with ophthalmia or fever.

Robert A. Heinlein photo
Robert A. Heinlein photo
Russell Crowe photo

„If it's not going to be that serious, I don't want to do it. It's a personal taste.“

—  Russell Crowe New Zealand-born Australian actor, film producer and musician 1964

GQ Interview (2005)
Contexto: If it's not going to be that serious, I don't want to do it. It's a personal taste. I don't like watching an actor have the same fucking hairdo from time period to time period, from character to character— I just think it's bullshit. It's a waste of money and a waste of my time as an audience member.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“