„The poet is a pretender.
He pretends so completely,
that he even pretends that it is pain
the pain he really feels.“

—  Fernando Pessoa, O poeta é um fingidor. Finge tão completamente Que chega a fingir que é dor A dor que deveras sente. "Autopsicografia" ["Autopsychography"], in Presença, No. 36 (November 1932) Fernando Pessoa's most translated poem. Richard Zenith's translation: The poet is a faker Who's so good at his act He even fakes the pain Of pain he feels in fact.
Original

O poeta é um fingidor. Finge tão completamente Que chega a fingir que é dor A dor que deveras sente.

Fernando Pessoa, Autopsicografia; Publicado em 1 de Abril de 1931

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Fernando Pessoa928
poeta português 1888 - 1935
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