„Man is only miserable so far as he thinks himself so.“

—  Jacopo Sannazaro, Ecloga Octava; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), "Mind".
Original

Tanto è miser l'uom quant' ei si riputa.

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Jacopo Sannazaro
1456 - 1530
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