„Longer than a winter's night for a man who is ill-wed.“

Más largo
que una noche de Diciembre
para un hombre mal casado.
"Murmuraban los rocines", line 94, cited from Poesias de D. Luis de Gongora y Argote (Madrid: Imprenta Nacional, 1820) p. 83. Translation from Henry Baerlein The House of the Fighting-cocks (London: Leonard Parsons, 1922) p. 92.

Original

Más largo que una noche de Diciembre para un hombre mal casado.

Última atualização 22 de Maio de 2020. História

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