„The moral hero, guided as he or she is by the ethical experience, who carves out an adventurous path is akin to the discoverer who brings order into the scattered elements of a science or the artist who composes a piece of music or designs buildings.“

Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Citações relacionadas

Charles Mingus photo

„What do you think happens to a composer who is sincere and loves to write and has to wait thirty years to have someone play a piece of his music?“

—  Charles Mingus American jazz double bassist, composer and bandleader 1922 - 1979

As quoted in Setting the Tempo : Fifty Years of Great Jazz Liner Notes (1996) by Tom Piazza. p. 339
Contexto: What do you think happens to a composer who is sincere and loves to write and has to wait thirty years to have someone play a piece of his music? Had I been born in a different country or had I been born white, I am sure I would have expressed my ideas long ago. Maybe they wouldn't have been as good because when people are born free — I can't imagine it, but I've got a feeling that if it's so easy for you — the struggle and the initiative are not as strong as they are for a person who has to struggle and therefore has more to say.

Jeffrey Tucker photo

„That experiment prefigured today’s rap “artists,” who are entirely dependent on promoters, arrangers, and sound technicians, and create no music themselves.“

—  Jeffrey Tucker American writer 1963

Fonte: "Powerful Song, Man" by Jeffrey Tucker, The Rothbard-Rockwell Report, August 1997, UNZ.org, 2016-05-22 http://www.unz.org/Pub/RothbardRockwellReport-1997aug-00009,

Iannis Xenakis photo
Jacob Bronowski photo

„Those who think that science is ethically neutral confuse the findings of science, which are, with the activity of science, which is not.“

—  Jacob Bronowski Polish-born British mathematician 1908 - 1974

Part 3: "The Sense of Human Dignity", §6 (p. 63–64)
Science and Human Values (1956, 1965)
Contexto: Tolerance among scientists cannot be based on indifference, it must be based on respect. Respect as a personal value implies, in any society, the public acknowledgements of justice and of due honor. These are values which to the layman seem most remote from any abstract study. Justice, honor, the respect of man for man: What, he asks, have these human values to do with science? [... ]
Those who think that science is ethically neutral confuse the findings of science, which are, with the activity of science, which is not.

Thomas Jefferson photo

„He who made us would have been a pitiful bungler, if he had made the rules of our moral conduct a matter of science. For one man of science, there are thousands who are not. What would have become of them?“

—  Thomas Jefferson 3rd President of the United States of America 1743 - 1826

1780s, Letter to Peter Carr (1787)
Contexto: He who made us would have been a pitiful bungler, if he had made the rules of our moral conduct a matter of science. For one man of science, there are thousands who are not. What would have become of them? Man was destined for society. His morality, therefore, was to be formed to this object. He was endowed with a sense of right and wrong, merely relative to this.

Pablo Neruda photo

„He who does not travel, who does not read,
who does not listen to music,
who does not find grace in himself,
she who does not find grace in herself,
dies slowly.
He who slowly destroys his own self-esteem,
who does not allow himself to be helped“

—  Pablo Neruda Chilean poet 1904 - 1973

dies slowly…
Muere lentamente quien no viaja, quien no lee,
quien no oye música,
quien no encuentra gracia en sí mismo.
Muere lentamente
quien destruye su amor propio,
quien no se deja ayudar...
Poem "Muere lentamente" (Dying Slowly), wrongly attributed to Pablo Neruda. See "Fake Pablo Neruda Poem Spreads on Internet" http://www.laht.com/article.asp?ArticleId=325275&CategoryId=14094 by Ana Mendoza, Latin American Herald Tribune (12 January 2009).
Misattributed
Fonte: Selected Poems

Epictetus photo

„For he who is unmusical is a child in music; he who is without letters is a child in learning; he who is untaught, is a child in life.“

—  Epictetus philosopher from Ancient Greece 50 - 138

Book III, ch. 19. http://books.google.com/books?id=7e0NAAAAYAAJ&q=%22For+he+who+is+unmusical+is+a+child+in+music+he+who+is+without+letters+is+a+child+in+learning+he+who+is+untaught+is+a+child+in+life%22&pg=PA241#v=onepage
Discourses

Hunter S. Thompson photo

„Bush is a natural-born loser with a filthy-rich daddy who pimped his son out to rich oil-mongers. He hates music, football and sex, in no particular order, and he is no fun at all.“

—  Hunter S. Thompson American journalist and author 1937 - 2005

"Fear and Loathing, Campaign 2004" (20 October 2004) http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/story/6562575/fear_and_loathing_campaign_2004/
2000s

Mark Hopkins (educator) photo
Alfred Brendel photo
Burkard Schliessmann photo
Emil M. Cioran photo

„The producer orders a certain title.
The musical director orders a certain rhythm.
The dance director orders a certain number of bars.
And the composer orders a certain number… of aspirin.“

—  Frank Loesser American songwriter 1910 - 1969

on working in Hollywood
Reported by musician Michael Feinstein, transcript of * Fresh Air Celebrates Frank Loesser's 100th Birthday
http://www.npr.org/2010/06/29/128169934/fresh-air-celebrates-frank-loesser-s-100th-birthday
Fresh Air
http://www.npr.org/programs/fresh-air/
Host: Terry Gross, Guest: Michael Feinstein
NPR
WHYY
Philadelphia
2009-06-29
2:34
http://www.npr.org/templates/transcript/transcript.php?storyId=128169934

Salman Rushdie photo
Aaron Copland photo
Jerry Coyne photo
Albert Einstein photo

„The most beautiful and deepest experience a man can have is the sense of the mysterious. It is the underlying principle of religion as well as all serious endeavor in art and science. He who never had this experience seems to me, if not dead, then at least blind.“

—  Albert Einstein German-born physicist and founder of the theory of relativity 1879 - 1955

1930s, My Credo (1932)
Contexto: The most beautiful and deepest experience a man can have is the sense of the mysterious. It is the underlying principle of religion as well as all serious endeavor in art and science. He who never had this experience seems to me, if not dead, then at least blind. To sense that behind anything that can be experienced there is a something that our mind cannot grasp and whose beauty and sublimity reaches us only indirectly and as a feeble reflection, this is religiousness.
In this sense I am religious. To me it suffices to wonder at these secrets and to attempt humbly to grasp with my mind a mere image of the lofty structure of all that there is.

Upton Sinclair photo

„The story of the hero who slays the devouring dragon was not merely a symbol of day and night, of summer and winter; it was a literal explanation of the phenomena, it was the science of early times.“

—  Upton Sinclair, livro The Profits of Religion

Book One : The Church of the Conquerors, "The Priestly Lie"
The Profits of Religion (1918)
Contexto: When the first savage saw his hut destroyed by a bolt of lightning, he fell down upon his face in terror. He had no conception of natural forces, of laws of electricity; he saw this event as the act of an individual intelligence. To-day we read about fairies and demons, dryads and fauns and satyrs, Wotan and Thor and Vulcan, Freie and Flora and Ceres, and we think of all these as pretty fancies, play-products of the mind; losing sight of the fact that they were originally meant with entire seriousness—that not merely did ancient man believe in them, but was forced to believe in them, because the mind must have an explanation of things that happen, and an individual intelligence was the only explanation available. The story of the hero who slays the devouring dragon was not merely a symbol of day and night, of summer and winter; it was a literal explanation of the phenomena, it was the science of early times.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe photo

„Who science has and art
He has religion too
Who neither of them owns
Religion is his due.“

—  Johann Wolfgang von Goethe German writer, artist, and politician 1749 - 1832

Wer Wissenschaft und Kunst besitzt, / Hat auch Religion / Wer jene beiden nicht besitzt / Der habe Religion
As quoted in Jost Lemmerich's "Science and Conscience: The Life of James Franck" (2011), p. 261.
Variant translation: "The man who science has and art, He also has religion. But he who is devoid of both, He surely needs religion." (as quoted in "Homilies of science" by Paul Carus (1892) and The Open Court, Weekly Journal, Vol. II (1887).
Wilhelm Meister's Lehrjahre (Apprenticeship) (1786–1830)

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“