„One lucent corner windowing hidden things
Forced the world's blind immensity to sight.
The darkness failed and slipped like a falling cloak
From the reclining body of a god.“

—  Sri Aurobindo, livro Savitri: A Legend and a Symbol

Savitri (1918-1950), Book One : The Book Of Beginnings

Sri Aurobindo photo
Sri Aurobindo1
Nacionalista indiano, lutador da liberdade, filósofo, iogue… 1872 - 1950

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„One may call the world a myth, in which bodies and things are visible, but souls and minds hidden.“

—  Sallustius Roman philosopher and writer

III. Concerning myths; that they are divine, and why.
On the Gods and the Cosmos
Contexto: One may call the world a myth, in which bodies and things are visible, but souls and minds hidden. Besides, to wish to teach the whole truth about the Gods to all produces contempt in the foolish, because they cannot understand, and lack of zeal in the good, whereas to conceal the truth by myths prevents the contempt of the foolish, and compels the good to practice philosophy.

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Bruce Cockburn photo

„Catching the light and falling into dark
And the world fades out like an overheard remark…
In the falling dark“

—  Bruce Cockburn Canadian folk/rock guitarist and singer-songwriter 1945

Title track, In The Falling Dark (See also: John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book I, lines 62-63) Just Listen.. http://www.youtube.com//watch?v=lYAFzVTLIQs
In the Falling Dark (1976)

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Jung Myung Seok photo

„Even if a person lived enjoying many things in the world, if their spirit fails to be saved, they will come to an end in the ‘world of the body.“

—  Jung Myung Seok South Korean Leader of New Religious Movement, Poet, Author, Founder of Wolmyeongdong Center 1945

Extracted from Proverbs Blog https://providencepath.wordpress.com/2016/06/07/jung-myung-seok-saving-your-spirit/

Albert Hofmann photo

„It was these experiences that shaped the main outlines of my world view and convinced me of the existence of a miraculous, powerful, unfathomable reality that was hidden from everyday sight.“

—  Albert Hofmann Swiss chemist 1906 - 2008

Foreword http://www.psychedelic-library.org/childf.htm
LSD : My Problem Child (1980)
Contexto: There are experiences that most of us are hesitant to speak about, because they do not conform to everyday reality and defy rational explanation. These are not particular external occurrences, but rather events of our inner lives, which are generally dismissed as figments of the imagination and barred from our memory. Suddenly, the familiar view of our surroundings is transformed in a strange, delightful, or alarming way: it appears to us in a new light, takes on a special meaning. Such an experience can be as light and fleeting as a breath of air, or it can imprint itself deeply upon our minds.
One enchantment of that kind, which I experienced in childhood, has remained remarkably vivid in my memory ever since. It happened on a May morning — I have forgotten the year — but I can still point to the exact spot where it occurred, on a forest path on Martinsberg above Baden, Switzerland. As I strolled through the freshly greened woods filled with bird song and lit up by the morning sun, all at once everything appeared in an uncommonly clear light. Was this something I had simply failed to notice before? Was I suddenly discovering the spring forest as it actually looked? It shone with the most beautiful radiance, speaking to the heart, as though it wanted to encompass me in its majesty. I was filled with an indescribable sensation of joy, oneness, and blissful security.
I have no idea how long I stood there spellbound. But I recall the anxious concern I felt as the radiance slowly dissolved and I hiked on: how could a vision that was so real and convincing, so directly and deeply felt — how could it end so soon? And how could I tell anyone about it, as my overflowing joy compelled me to do, since I knew there were no words to describe what I had seen? It seemed strange that I, as a child, had seen something so marvelous, something that adults obviously did not perceive — for I had never heard them mention it.
While still a child, I experienced several more of these deeply euphoric moments on my rambles through forest and meadow. It was these experiences that shaped the main outlines of my world view and convinced me of the existence of a miraculous, powerful, unfathomable reality that was hidden from everyday sight.

Horace Mann photo

„The intellectual and moral nature of man is the one thing precious in the sight of God“

—  Horace Mann American politician 1796 - 1859

p. 183
Contexto: The intellectual and moral nature of man is the one thing precious in the sight of God; and therefore, until this nature is cultivated, and enlightened, and purified, neither opulence, nor power, nor learning, nor genius, nor domestic sanctity, nor the holiness of God's altars, can ever be safe. Until the immortal and god-like capacities of every being that comes iuto the world are deemed more worthy, are watched more tenderly than any other thing, no dynasty of men, or form of government, can stand, or shall stand, upon the face of the earth; and the force or the fraud which would seek to uphold them, shall be but "as fetters of flax to bind the flame."

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„To say that God turns away from the evil is like saying that the sun hides himself from the blind.“

—  Sallustius Roman philosopher and writer

XIV. In what sense, though the Gods never change, they are said to be made angry and appeased.
On the Gods and the Cosmos
Contexto: If any one thinks the doctrine of the unchangeableness of the Gods is reasonable and true, and then wonders how it is that they rejoice in the good and reject the bad, are angry with sinners and become propitious when appeased, the answer is as follows: God does not rejoice — for that which rejoices also grieves; nor is he angered — for to be angered is a passion; nor is he appeased by gifts — if he were, he would be conquered by pleasure.
It is impious to suppose that the divine is affected for good or ill by human things. The Gods are always good and always do good and never harm, being always in the same state and like themselves. The truth simply is that, when we are good, we are joined to the Gods by our likeness to live according to virtue we cling to the Gods, and when we become evil we make the Gods our enemies — not because they are angered against us, but because our sins prevent the light of the Gods from shining upon us, and put us in communion with spirits of punishment. And if by prayers and sacrifices we find forgiveness of sins, we do not appease or change the Gods, but by what we do and by our turning toward the divine we heal our own badness and so enjoy again the goodness of the Gods. To say that God turns away from the evil is like saying that the sun hides himself from the blind.

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Charles P. Mattocks photo

„[Command] is one of the easiest things in the world if a man only is lavish of the immense power which is by the military code granted to a Regimental commander.“

—  Charles P. Mattocks American soldier, lawyer and politician 1840 - 1910

Letter to his mother, in [Lorien Foote, The Yankee Plague: Escaped Union Prisoners and the Collapse of the Confederacy, https://books.google.com/books?id=d4kwDAAAQBAJ&pg=PA14, 5 October 2016, University of North Carolina Press, 978-1-4696-3056-4, 14–]

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