„Pythagoras said, that of cities that was the best which contained most worthy men.“

—  Estobeu

44
Pythagorean Ethical Sentences

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Pythagoras photo

„There are men and gods, and beings like Pythagoras.“

—  Pythagoras ancient Greek mathematician and philosopher -585 - -495 a.C.

Of himself, as quoted in A History of Western Philosophy (1945) by Bertrand Russell

Samuel Butler photo
Jack Donovan photo

„I train to be worthy enough to be worthy enough to 'carry water' for my barbarian fathers, and to be worthy of the company of the men most like them today. I train because I imagine the disgust and contempt out ancestors would have for us all if they lined up modern men on the street. I train to be less of an embarrassment to their memory. I train because most modern men dishonor all of the men who came before them. I train "as if" they were watching and judging us“

—  Jack Donovan American activist, editor and writer 1974

Train for honor
A Sky Without Eagles (2014)
Contexto: 'I train for honor'... I train because somewhere in my DNA there's a memory of a more ferocious world, a world where men could become what they are and reach the most terrifyingly magnificent state of their nature. I don't train to impress the majority of modern slobs. I train to be worthy enough to be worthy enough to 'carry water' for my barbarian fathers, and to be worthy of the company of the men most like them today. I train because I imagine the disgust and contempt out ancestors would have for us all if they lined up modern men on the street. I train to be less of an embarrassment to their memory. I train because most modern men dishonor all of the men who came before them. I train "as if" they were watching and judging us... I train because it is better to imagine oneself as a soldier in a spiritual army training for a war that may never come than it is to shrug, slouch and shuffle forward into a dysgenic and dystopian future.

Aristotle photo
Frederick Douglass photo
Jacques Ellul photo
Henri Barbusse photo

„Men have gone towards each other because of that ray of light which each of them contains; and light resembles light.“

—  Henri Barbusse French novelist 1873 - 1935

Light (1919), Ch. XVI - De Profundis Clamavi
Contexto: Men have gone towards each other because of that ray of light which each of them contains; and light resembles light. It reveals that the isolated man, too free in the open expanses, is doomed to adversity as if he were a captive, in spite of appearances; and that men must come together that they may be stronger, that they may be more peaceful, and even that they may be able to live.
For men are made to live their life in its depth, and also in all its length. Stronger than the elements and keener than all terrors are the hunger to last long, the passion to possess one's days to the very end and to make the best of them. It is not only a right; it is a virtue.

Robert Burton photo

„Aristotle said melancholy men of all others are most witty.“

—  Robert Burton, livro The Anatomy of Melancholy

Section 3, member 1, subsection 3.
The Anatomy of Melancholy (1621), Part I

Frederick Douglass photo

„For this feeling there are many apologies, for there was never yet an error, however flagrant and hurtful, for which some plausible defense could not be framed. Chattel slavery, king craft, priest craft, pious frauds, intolerance, persecution, suicide, assassination, repudiation, and a thousand other errors and crimes have all had their defenses and apologies. Prejudice of race and color has been equally upheld. The two best arguments in the defense are, first, the worthlessness of the class against which it is directed; and, second, that the feeling itself is entirely natural. The way to overcome the first argument is to work for the elevation of those deemed worthless, and thus make them worthy of regard, and they will soon become worthy and not worthless. As to the natural argument, it may be said that nature has many sides. Many things are in a certain sense natural, which are neither wise nor best. It is natural to walk, but shall men therefore refuse to ride? It is natural to ride on horseback, shall men therefore refuse steam and rail?“

—  Frederick Douglass American social reformer, orator, writer and statesman 1818 - 1895

1860s, Our Composite Nationality (1869)
Contexto: I need not repeat here the multitude of reproachful epithets expressive of the same sentiment among ourselves. All who are not to the manor born have been made to feel the lash and sting of these reproachful names. For this feeling there are many apologies, for there was never yet an error, however flagrant and hurtful, for which some plausible defense could not be framed. Chattel slavery, king craft, priest craft, pious frauds, intolerance, persecution, suicide, assassination, repudiation, and a thousand other errors and crimes have all had their defenses and apologies. Prejudice of race and color has been equally upheld. The two best arguments in the defense are, first, the worthlessness of the class against which it is directed; and, second, that the feeling itself is entirely natural. The way to overcome the first argument is to work for the elevation of those deemed worthless, and thus make them worthy of regard, and they will soon become worthy and not worthless. As to the natural argument, it may be said that nature has many sides. Many things are in a certain sense natural, which are neither wise nor best. It is natural to walk, but shall men therefore refuse to ride? It is natural to ride on horseback, shall men therefore refuse steam and rail? Civilization is itself a constant war upon some forces in nature, shall we therefore abandon civilization and go back to savage life? Nature has two voices, the one high, the other low; one is in sweet accord with reason and justice, and the other apparently at war with both. The more men know of the essential nature of things, and of the true relation of mankind, the freer they are from prejudice of every kind. The child is afraid of the giant form of his own shadow. This is natural, but he will part with his fears when he is older and wiser. So ignorance is full of prejudice, but it will disappear with enlightenment. But I pass on.

Michel De Montaigne photo

„How many worthy men have we seen survive their own reputation!“

—  Michel De Montaigne, livro Ensaios

Book II, Ch. 16. Of Glory
Essais (1595), Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919)
Variante: How many valiant men we have seen to survive their own reputation!

Confucius photo
Abraham Lincoln photo
William Shakespeare photo
Jack Donovan photo
Rudyard Kipling photo
Qu Yuan photo

„Enough! There are no true men in the state: no one to understand me.
Why should I cleave to the city of my birth?
Since none is worthy to work with in making good government,
I will go and join Peng Xian in the place where he abides.“

—  Qu Yuan ancient Chinese poet -343 - -278 a.C.

Lines 186–188
"Encountering Sorrow" (trans. David Hawkes)
Original: (zh) 乱曰:已矣哉,
国无人莫我知兮,又何怀乎故都?
既莫足与为美政兮,吾将从彭咸之所居。

Joss Whedon photo

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“