„Can princes born in palaces be sensible of the misery of those who dwell in cottages?“

No. 56.
Maxims and Moral Sentences

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Benjamin Disraeli photo

„The palace is not safe, when the cottage is not happy.“

—  Benjamin Disraeli British Conservative politician, writer, aristocrat and Prime Minister 1804 - 1881

Speech to Wynyard Horticultural Show (1848), quoted in William Flavelle Monypenny and George Earle Buckle, The Life of Benjamin Disraeli, Earl of Beaconsfield. Volume II. 1860–1881 (London: John Murray, 1929), p. 709.
1840s

Oliver Heaviside photo

„We do not dwell in the Palace of Truth.“

—  Oliver Heaviside electrical engineer, mathematician and physicist 1850 - 1925

Electromagnetic Theory (1893) Vol. 1, p. 1. https://books.google.com/books?id=9ukEAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA1
Contexto: We do not dwell in the Palace of Truth. But, as was mentioned to me not long since, "There is a time coming when all things shall be found out." I am not so sanguine myself, believing that the well in which Truth is said to reside is really a bottomless pit.

Charles Mackay photo
Samuel Butler (poet) photo
Jane Austen photo

„Let other pens dwell on guilt and misery.“

—  Jane Austen, livro Mansfield Park

Mansfield Park (1814)
Works, Mansfield Park

Benjamin Disraeli photo

„"As for that," said Waldenshare, "sensible men are all of the same religion."
"Pray, what is that?" inquired the Prince.
"Sensible men never tell."“

—  Benjamin Disraeli British Conservative politician, writer, aristocrat and Prime Minister 1804 - 1881

Fonte: Books, Coningsby (1844), Endymion (1880), Ch. 81. An anecdote is related of Sir Anthony Ashley Cooper (1621–1683), who, in speaking of religion, said, "People differ in their discourse and profession about these matters, but men of sense are really but of one religion." To the inquiry of "What religion?" the Earl said, "Men of sense never tell it", reported in Burnet, History of my own Times, vol. i. p. 175, note (edition 1833).

Nicolas Chamfort photo

„Petty souls are more susceptible to ambition than great ones, just as straw or thatched cottages burn more easily than palaces.“

—  Nicolas Chamfort French writer 1741 - 1794

L'ambition prend aux petites âmes plus facilement qu'aux grandes, comme le feu prend plus aisément à la paille, aux chaumières qu'aux palais.
Maximes et Pensées, #68
Reflections

Michel De Montaigne photo

„Writing does not cause misery. It is born of misery.“

—  Michel De Montaigne (1533-1592) French-Occitan author, humanistic philosopher, statesman 1533 - 1592

Attributed

William Blake photo
Niccolo Machiavelli photo

„A prince ought to have no other aim or thought, nor select anything else for his study, than war and its rules and discipline; for this is the sole art that belongs to him who rules, and it is of such force that it not only upholds those who are born princes, but it often enables men to rise from a private station to that rank.“

—  Niccolo Machiavelli, livro O Príncipe

Fonte: The Prince (1513), Ch. 14; Variant: A prince should therefore have no other aim or thought, nor take up any other thing for his study but war and it organization and discipline, for that is the only art that is necessary to one who commands.
Contexto: A prince ought to have no other aim or thought, nor select anything else for his study, than war and its rules and discipline; for this is the sole art that belongs to him who rules, and it is of such force that it not only upholds those who are born princes, but it often enables men to rise from a private station to that rank. And, on the contrary, it is seen that when princes have thought more of ease than of arms they have lost their states. And the first cause of your losing it is to neglect this art; and what enables you to acquire a state is to be master of the art.

George Eliot photo

„It is seldom that the miserable can help regarding their misery as a wrong inflicted by those who are less miserable.“

—  George Eliot English novelist, journalist and translator 1819 - 1880

Fonte: Silas Marner: The Weaver of Raveloe (1861), Chapter 12 (at page 107)

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„Extreme hopes are born from extreme misery.“

—  Bertrand Russell logician, one of the first analytic philosophers and political activist 1872 - 1970

George MacDonald photo

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“