„Every object and purpose of justice is effectually answered, and every supposed inconvenience is effectually rebutted by the law as it stands.“

—  Sir John Bayley, 1st Baronet, King v. Woolf (1819), 1 Chit. 423.
Sir John Bayley, 1st Baronet21
British judge 1763 - 1841
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 Tacitus photo

„Good habits are here more effectual than good laws elsewhere.“

—  Tacitus Roman senator and historian 58 - 120
End of chapter 19, http://www.unrv.com/tacitus/tacitus-germania-5.php

Gustav Radbruch photo
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Henry Bickersteth, 1st Baron Langdale photo
Edward Law, 1st Baron Ellenborough photo

„Every one must be supposed to be cognizant of a public law.“

—  Edward Law, 1st Baron Ellenborough Lord Chief Justice of England 1750 - 1818
Smith v. Beadnell (1807), 1 Camp. 33.

Raymond Chandler photo
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Jeremy Bentham photo

„Every law is an evil, for every law is an infraction of liberty: And I repeat that government has but a choice of evils“

—  Jeremy Bentham British philosopher, jurist, and social reformer 1748 - 1832
Context: It is with government, as with medicine. They have both but a choice of evils. Every law is an evil, for every law is an infraction of liberty: And I repeat that government has but a choice of evils: In making this choice, what ought to be the object of the legislator? He ought to assure himself of two things; 1st, that in every case, the incidents which he tries to prevent are really evils; and 2ndly, that if evils, they are greater than those which he employs to prevent them. There are then two things to be regarded; the evil of the offence and the evil of the law; the evil of the malady and the evil of the remedy. An evil comes rarely alone. A lot of evil cannot well fall upon an individual without spreading itself about him, as about a common centre. In the course of its progress we see it take different shapes: we see evil of one kind issue from evil of another kind; evil proceed from good and good from evil. All these changes, it is important to know and to distinguish; in this, in fact, consists the essence of legislation. Principles of Legislation (1830), Ch. X : Analysis of Political Good and Evil; How they are spread in society

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Margaret Fuller photo

„There is another mode which enters into the natural history of every thing that breathes and lives, which believes no impulse to be entirely in vain, which scrutinizes circumstances, motive and object before it condemns, and believes there is a beauty in natural form, if its law and purpose be understood.“

—  Margaret Fuller American feminist, poet, author, and activist 1810 - 1850
Context: There are two modes of criticism. One which … crushes to earth without mercy all the humble buds of Phantasy, all the plants that, though green and fruitful, are also a prey to insects or have suffered by drouth. It weeds well the garden, and cannot believe the weed in its native soil may be a pretty, graceful plant. There is another mode which enters into the natural history of every thing that breathes and lives, which believes no impulse to be entirely in vain, which scrutinizes circumstances, motive and object before it condemns, and believes there is a beauty in natural form, if its law and purpose be understood. "Poets of the People" in Art, Literature and the Drama (1858).

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Margaret Thatcher photo

„Iraq's invasion of Kuwait defies every principle for which the United Nations stands. If we let it succeed, no small country can ever feel safe again. The law of the jungle would take over from the rule of law.“

—  Margaret Thatcher British stateswoman and politician 1925 - 2013
Speech to the Aspen Institute ("Shaping a New Global Community") (5 August 1990) http://www.margaretthatcher.org/document/108174

Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. photo

„Every opinion tends to become a law.“

—  Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. United States Supreme Court justice 1841 - 1935
198 U.S. at 75.

Tony Benn photo

„The engineers are taking their stand on grounds of conscience... Conscientious objection to the law is not a criminal act. These people are our people and we should take a principled stand, together.“

—  Tony Benn British Labour Party politician 1925 - 2014
Speech on Hugh Scanlon's union's rejection of the Industrial Relations Act in Wells, Somerset (23 November 1973).

Theodore Roosevelt photo

„Every special interest is entitled to justice-full, fair, and complete“

—  Theodore Roosevelt American politician, 26th president of the United States 1858 - 1919
Context: Now, this means that our government, National and State, must be freed from the sinister influence or control of special interests. Exactly as the special interests of cotton and slavery threatened our political integrity before the Civil War, so now the great special business interests too often control and corrupt the men and methods of government for their own profit. We must drive the special interests out of politics. That is one of our tasks to-day. Every special interest is entitled to justice-full, fair, and complete — and, now, mind you, if there were any attempt by mob-violence to plunder and work harm to the special interest, whatever it may be, that I most dislike, and the wealthy man, whomsoever he may be, for whom I have the greatest contempt, I would fight for him, and you would if you were worth your salt. He should have justice. For every special interest is entitled to justice, but not one is entitled to a vote in Congress, to a voice on the bench, or to representation in any public office. The Constitution guarantees protection to property, and we must make that promise good. But it does not give the right of suffrage to any corporation.

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