„Architecture reflects society, and this is not a great age. (p.276)“

Richard Roth, Jr. photo
Richard Roth, Jr.3
American architect
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„Great ages of innovation are the ages in which entire cultures are junked or scrapped. (p. 309)“

—  Marshall McLuhan Canadian educator, philosopher, and scholar-- a professor of English literature, a literary critic, and a communicat... 1918 - 1980

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„The golden age of mathematics - that was not the age of Euclid, it is ours. (p. 268)“

—  Cassius Jackson Keyser American mathematician and journalist of pronounced philosophical inclinations 1862 - 1947

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„In the electric age we wear all mankind as our skin. (p. 47)“

—  Marshall McLuhan Canadian educator, philosopher, and scholar-- a professor of English literature, a literary critic, and a communicat... 1918 - 1980

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„The Age of Writing has passed. We must invent a new metaphor, restructure our thoughts and feelings. (p. 14)“

—  Marshall McLuhan Canadian educator, philosopher, and scholar-- a professor of English literature, a literary critic, and a communicat... 1918 - 1980

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„The Greek “point of view” in both art and chronology has little in common with ours but was much like that of the Middle Ages. (p. 64)“

—  Marshall McLuhan Canadian educator, philosopher, and scholar-- a professor of English literature, a literary critic, and a communicat... 1918 - 1980

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Marshall McLuhan photo

„The electronic age is a world in which causes and effects become almost interchangeable, as in music structures. (p. 99)“

—  Marshall McLuhan Canadian educator, philosopher, and scholar-- a professor of English literature, a literary critic, and a communicat... 1918 - 1980

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Robert Hunter (author) photo

„Society as a whole would return... to the actual poverty of an agricultural and handicraft age.“

—  Robert Hunter (author) American sociologist, author, golf course architect 1874 - 1942
Context: Associated production would be rendered impossible. Profit, rent, and interest would be no more. There would be no diversified division of labor. Cities and industrial communities would dwindle and disappear. Society as a whole would return... to the actual poverty of an agricultural and handicraft age. A community of Indians in America before the invasion of the whites had as much social organization as Tolstoy seems to have felt necessary for mankind. "The Anarchists are right in everything..." he writes, except "only in thinking that Anarchy can be instituted by a revolution." The entire world would be broken into atoms—each an individualist standing alone. p. 74-75

Lyubov Popova photo

„The role of the 'representational arts' - painting, sculpture, and even architecture.... has ended, as it is no longer necessary for the consciousness of our age, and everything art has to offer can simply be classified as a throwback.“

—  Lyubov Popova Russian artist 1889 - 1924
Quote, c. 1921; from Lyubov' Popova, in 'Commentary on Drawings', trans. ed. James West, in Art Into Life: Russian Constructivism, 1914-1932; catalogue for exhibition Rizzoli, New York: 1990, p. 69 (Popova's original text, in the Manuscript Division, State Tretiakov Gallery, Moscow, f. 148, ed. khr. 17, 1. 4.)

Horace Mann photo

„Every school boy and school girl who has arrived at the age of reflection ought to know something about the history of the art of printing“

—  Horace Mann American politician 1796 - 1859
Context: Every school boy and school girl who has arrived at the age of reflection ought to know something about the history of the art of printing, papermaking, and so forth. … All children will work better if pleased with their tools; and there are no tools more ingeniously wrought, or more potent than those which belong to the art of the printer. Dynasties and governments used to be attacked and defended by arms; now the attack and the defence are mainly carried on by types. To sustain any scheme of state policy, to uphold one administration or to demolish another, types, not soldiers, are brought into line. Hostile parties, and sometimes hostile nations, instead of fitting out martial or naval expeditions, establish printing presses, and discharge pamphlets or octavoes at each other, instead of cannon balls. The poniard and the stiletto were once the resource of a murderous spirit; now the vengeance, which formerly would assassinate in the dark, libels character, in the light of day, through the medium of the press. But through this instrumentality good can be wrought as well as evil. Knowledge can be acquired, diffused, perpetuated. An invisible, inaudible, intangible thought in the silent chambers of the mind, breaks away from its confinement, becomes imbodied in a sign, is multiplied by myriads, traverses the earth, and goes resounding down to the latest posterity. "Printing and Paper Making" in The Common School Journal Vol. V, No. 3 (1 February 1843)