„From such a face and form as mine, the noblest sentiments sound like the black utterances of a depraved imagination!
It's human nature! I'm resigned.“

—  W. S. Gilbert, H.M.S. Pinafore (1878)
W. S. Gilbert photo
W. S. Gilbert1
1836 - 1911
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„Human nature with all its infirmities and depravation is still capable of great things.“

—  John Adams 2nd President of the United States 1735 - 1826
1770s, Context: Human nature with all its infirmities and depravation is still capable of great things. It is capable of attaining to degrees of wisdom and goodness, which we have reason to believe, appear as respectable in the estimation of superior intelligences. Education makes a greater difference between man and man, than nature has made between man and brute. The virtues and powers to which men may be trained, by early education and constant discipline, are truly sublime and astonishing. Newton and Locke are examples of the deep sagacity which may be acquired by long habits of thinking and study. Letter to Abigail Adams (29 October 1775), published Letters of John Adams, Addressed to His Wife, Vol. 1 (1841), ed. Charles Francis Adams, p. 72

Robert Leighton photo

„Nobody, I believe, will deny, that we are to form our judgment of the true nature of the human mind, not from sloth and stupidity of the most degenerate and vilest of men, but from the sentiments and fervent desires of the best and wisest of the species.“

—  Robert Leighton 17th century Archbishop of Glasgow, and Principal of the University of Edinburgh 1611 - 1684
Theological Lectures, No. 5, "Of the Immortality of the Soul", reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 514.

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Jeff Lynne photo

„I like the natural sound of a room.“

—  Jeff Lynne British rock musician 1947
Context: I like the natural sound of a room. All the rooms have their own sound, so it's a matter of putting it where you like and seeing what it sounds like. On the placement of microphones in the production of the album Zoom, in "An Electric return for Jeff Lynne" at CNN (3 September 2001) http://archives.cnn.com/2001/SHOWBIZ/Music/09/03/jeff.lynne/

William Blake photo

„But to the Eyes of the Man of Imagination, Nature is Imagination itself. As a man is, So he Sees. As the Eye is formed, such are its Powers.“

—  William Blake English Romantic poet and artist 1757 - 1827
Letter to Revd. Dr. Trusler (1799), Context: To the Eyes of a Miser a Guinea is more beautiful than the Sun & and a bag worn with the use of Money has more beautiful proportions than a Vine filled with Grapes. The tree which moves some to tears of joy is in the Eyes of others only a Green thing that stands in the way. Some see Nature all Ridicule and Deformity, and by these I shall not regulate my proportions; and some scarce see Nature at all. But to the Eyes of the Man of Imagination, Nature is Imagination itself. As a man is, So he Sees. As the Eye is formed, such are its Powers..

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Rollo May photo

„The human imagination leaps to form the whole, to complete the scene in order to make sense of it.“

—  Rollo May US psychiatrist 1909 - 1994
The Courage to Create (1975), Context: The human imagination leaps to form the whole, to complete the scene in order to make sense of it. The instantaneous way this is done shows how we are driven to construct the remainder of the scene. To fill the gaps is essential if the scene is to have meaning. That we may do this in misleading ways — at times in neurotic or paranoid ways — does not gainsay the central point. Our passion for form expresses our yearning to make the world adequate to our needs and desires, and, more important, to experience ourselves as having significance. Ch. 7 : Passion for Form, p. 131

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„To legislation… the Puritans resorted. Instead of guiding, they repressed, and thus pitted themselves against the unconquerable impulses of human nature. Believing that nature to be depraved, they felt themselves logically warranted in putting it in irons. But they failed; and their failure ought to be a warning to their successors.“

—  John Tyndall British scientist 1820 - 1893
New Fragments (1892), Context: To legislation... the Puritans resorted. Instead of guiding, they repressed, and thus pitted themselves against the unconquerable impulses of human nature. Believing that nature to be depraved, they felt themselves logically warranted in putting it in irons. But they failed; and their failure ought to be a warning to their successors.<!--p.34

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