„If the passion for truthfulness is merely controlled and stilled without being satisfied, it will kill the activities it is supposed to support. This may be one of the reasons why, at the present time, the study of the humanities runs a risk of sliding from professional seriousness, through professionalization, to a finally disenchanted careerism.“

Fonte: Truth and Truthfulness (2002), p. 3

Bernard Williams photo
Bernard Williams1
1929 - 2003

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[O] : Introduction, 0.8
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Contexto: A general semiotics studies the whole of the human signifying activity — languages — and languages are what constitutes human beings as such, that is, as semiotic animals. It studies and describes languages through languages. By studying the human signifying activity it influences its course. A general semiotics transforms, for the very fact of its theoretical claim, its own object.

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„Merely reading the Bible is no use at all without we study it thoroughly, and hunt it through, as it were, for some great truth.“

—  Dwight L. Moody American evangelist and publisher 1837 - 1899

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„Amateurs think that if they were inspired all the time, they could be professionals. Professional know that if they relied on inspiration, they'd be amateurs“

—  Philip Pullman English author 1946

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Contexto: If you're going to make a living at this business - more importantly, if you're going to write anything that will last - you have to realise that a lot of the time, you're going to be writing without inspiration. The trick is to write just as well without it as with. Of course, you write less readily and fluently without it; but the interesting thing is to look at the private journals and letters of great writers and see how much of the time they just had to do without inspiration. Conrad, for example, groaned at the desperate emptiness of the pages he faced; and yet he managed to cover them. Amateurs think that if they were inspired all the time, they could be professionals. Professional know that if they relied on inspiration, they'd be amateurs.

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„Passion, intellect, moral activity — these three have never been satisfied in a woman. In this cold and oppressive conventional atmosphere, they cannot be satisfied.“

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Contexto: Passion, intellect, moral activity — these three have never been satisfied in a woman. In this cold and oppressive conventional atmosphere, they cannot be satisfied. To say more on this subject would be to enter into the whole history of society, of the present state of civilisation.

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„Through certain humors or passions, and from temper merely, a man may be completely miserable, let his outward circumstances be ever so fortunate.“

—  Anthony Ashley-Cooper, 3rd Earl of Shaftesbury English politician and Earl 1671 - 1713

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„.. translated by instinct, without any method, not merely an artistic truth but above all a human one.“

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„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“