„MANY Men swallow the being cheated, but no Man could ever endure to chew it.“

Political, Moral, and Miscellaneous Reflections (1750), Miscellaneous Thoughts and Reflections

Obtido da Wikiquote. Última atualização 3 de Junho de 2021. História

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Gwendolyn Brooks photo

„Be careful what you swallow. Chew!“

—  Gwendolyn Brooks American writer 1917 - 2000

Advice to graduates, Buena Vista University Graduation (1995)

Francis Bacon photo

„Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested.“

—  Francis Bacon, livro Essays

Essays (1625)
Contexto: Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested: that is, some books are to be read only in parts, others to be read, but not curiously, and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention.

Of Studies

Tennessee Williams photo
Ralph Waldo Emerson photo

„Men suffer all their life long, under the foolish superstition that they can be cheated. But it is as impossible for a man to be cheated by any one but himself, as for a thing to be and not to be at the same time.“

—  Ralph Waldo Emerson American philosopher, essayist, and poet 1803 - 1882

1840s, Essays: First Series (1841), Compensation
Contexto: Men suffer all their life long, under the foolish superstition that they can be cheated. But it is as impossible for a man to be cheated by any one but himself, as for a thing to be and not to be at the same time. There is a third silent party to all our bargains. The nature and soul of things takes on itself the guaranty of the fulfilment of every contract, so that honest service cannot come to loss. If you serve an ungrateful master, serve him the more. Put God in your debt. Every stroke shall be repaid. The longer the payment is withholden, the better for you; for compound interest on compound interest is the rate and usage of this exchequer.
The history of persecution is a history of endeavours to cheat nature, to make water run up hill, to twist a rope of sand. It makes no difference whether the actors be many or one, a tyrant or a mob. A mob is a society of bodies voluntarily bereaving themselves of reason, and traversing its work. The mob is man voluntarily descending to the nature of the beast. Its fit hour of activity is night. Its actions are insane like its whole constitution. It persecutes a principle; it would whip a right; it would tar and feather justice, by inflicting fire and outrage upon the houses and persons of those who have these. It resembles the prank of boys, who run with fire-engines to put out the ruddy aurora streaming to the stars. The inviolate spirit turns their spite against the wrongdoers. The martyr cannot be dishonored. Every lash inflicted is a tongue of fame; every prison, a more illustrious abode; every burned book or house enlightens the world; every suppressed or expunged word reverberates through the earth from side to side. Hours of sanity and consideration are always arriving to communities, as to individuals, when the truth is seen, and the martyrs are justified.
Thus do all things preach the indifferency of circumstances. The man is all. Every thing has two sides, a good and an evil. Every advantage has its tax. I learn to be content. But the doctrine of compensation is not the doctrine of indifferency. The thoughtless say, on hearing these representations, — What boots it to do well? there is one event to good and evil; if I gain any good, I must pay for it; if I lose any good, I gain some other; all actions are indifferent.
There is a deeper fact in the soul than compensation, to wit, its own nature. The soul is not a compensation, but a life. The soul is. Under all this running sea of circumstance, whose waters ebb and flow with perfect balance, lies the aboriginal abyss of real Being. Essence, or God, is not a relation, or a part, but the whole. Being is the vast affirmative, excluding negation, self-balanced, and swallowing up all relations, parts, and times within itself. Nature, truth, virtue, are the influx from thence. Vice is the absence or departure of the same.

Samuel Butler (poet) photo

„Doubtless the pleasure is as great
Of being cheated as to cheat.“

—  Samuel Butler (poet) poet and satirist 1612 - 1680

Canto III, line 1
Fonte: Hudibras, Part II (1664)

Edward Coke photo

„He is not cheated who knows he is being cheated.“

—  Edward Coke English lawyer and judge 1552 - 1634

The First Part of the Institutes of the Laws of England, or, A Commentary on Littleton, (London, 1628, ed. F. Hargrave and C. Butler, 19th ed., London, 1832), First Institute.
Institutes of the Laws of England

Jackie Mason photo

„Eighty percent of married men cheat in America. The rest cheat in Europe.“

—  Jackie Mason American rabbi and comedian 1931

Quoted in [Bill, Maxwell, In gloomy times, let's try to find a sense of humor, http://www.sptimes.com/2002/07/07/Columns/In_gloomy_times__let_.shtml, 2002-07-07, 2008-10-04, St. Petersburg Times]

François de La Rochefoucauld photo

„The intention of cheating no one lays us open to being cheated ourselves.“

—  François de La Rochefoucauld, livro Reflections; or Sentences and Moral Maxims

L'intention de ne jamais tromper nous expose à être souvent trompés.
Maxim 118.
Reflections; or Sentences and Moral Maxims (1665–1678)

Robert G. Ingersoll photo

„At that time the church had great power; it could retaliate; it could destroy. The church abandoned the stake only when too many men objected to being burned.“

—  Robert G. Ingersoll Union United States Army officer 1833 - 1899

"The Brooklyn Divines." Brooklyn Union (Brooklyn, NY), 1883.
Contexto: There was a time when an unbeliever, open and pronounced, was a wonder. At that time the church had great power; it could retaliate; it could destroy. The church abandoned the stake only when too many men objected to being burned.

Theognis of Megara photo

„Many bad men are rich, many good men are poor. But we will not exchange wealth for virtue along with them. One man has money now, another has money at another time. Money goes around, whereas virtue endures.“

—  Theognis of Megara Greek lyric poet active in approximately the sixth century BC -570 - -485 a.C.

πολλοί τοι πλουτοῦσι κακοί, ἀγαθοὶ δὲ πένονται:
ἀλλ᾽ ἡμεῖς τούτοις οὐ διαμειψόμεθα
τῆς ἀρετῆς τὸν πλοῦτον, ἐπεὶ τὸ μὲν ἔμπεδον αἰεί,
χρήματα δ᾽ ἀνθρώπων ἄλλοτε ἄλλος ἔχει.
Fonte: Elegies, Lines 315-318, also attributed to Solon

John Dryden photo
Francis Bacon photo
Nisargadatta Maharaj photo
John Lydon photo

„Ever get the feeling you've been cheated? Good night!“

—  John Lydon English singer, songwriter, and musician 1956

At the end of the last Sex Pistols concert, Winterland Theater, San Francisco, California (14 January 1978)

Anacharsis photo

„The forum [is] an established place for men to cheat one another, and behave covetously.“

—  Anacharsis Scythian philosopher

As quoted in The Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers by Diogenes Laërtius, as translated by C. D. Yonge) (1853), "Anacharsis" sect. 5, p. 48

Ludwig von Mises photo

„A free man must be able to endure it when his fellow men act and live otherwise than he considers proper.“

—  Ludwig von Mises, livro Liberalism

Ch. 1 : The Foundations of Liberal Policy § 11 : The Limits of Governmental Activity http://mises.org/liberal/ch1sec11.asp
Liberalism (1927)
Contexto: A free man must be able to endure it when his fellow men act and live otherwise than he considers proper. He must free himself from the habit, just as soon as something does not please him, of calling for the police.

Sri Chinmoy photo
Charles Darwin photo

„As it is certain that worms swallow many little stones, independently of those swallowed while excavating their burrows, it is probable that they serve, like mill-stones, to triturate their food.“

—  Charles Darwin, livro The Formation of Vegetable Mould through the Action of Worms

Fonte: The Formation of Vegetable Mould through the Action of Worms (1881), Chapter 1: Habits of Worms, p. 18. http://darwin-online.org.uk/content/frameset?pageseq=33&itemID=F1357&viewtype=image

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