„Deception, in turn, suggests morality: the morality of deceiving people into thinking something is so when it is not. [... ] The moral principle is this: whoever attempts to tame a part of a wicked problem, but not the whole, is morally wrong.“

—  Charles West Churchman, p. 142 cited in: Rob Hundman (2010) Weerbarstig veranderen. p. 38
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Citações relacionadas

„What seems to emerge is not a moral reprimand of the management scientist, but rather a moral problem of the profession, a wicked moral problem.“

—  C. West Churchman American philosopher and systems scientist 1913 - 2004
p. 142 cited in: Rob Hundman (2010) Weerbarstig veranderen. p. 38

„They understood the basic principles of morals: that nothing is moral always, and anything is moral under the right circumstances.“

—  John Varley American science fiction author 1947
"The Persistence of Vision", The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction (March 1978), reprinted as the title story in The Persistence of Vision (1978)

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Herbert Hoover photo

„When there is a lack of honor in government, the morals of the whole people are poisoned.“

—  Herbert Hoover 31st President of the United States of America 1874 - 1964
Quoted in the New York Times (9 August 1964)

Ayn Rand photo

„There can be no compromise on moral principles.“

—  Ayn Rand, The Virtue of Selfishness: A New Concept of Egoism

Will Cuppy photo
Susan Sontag photo
Khushwant Singh photo
Martin Luther King, Jr. photo
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Theodore Kaczynski photo
Frances Wright photo

„An opinion, right or wrong, can never constitute a moral offense, nor be in itself a moral obligation.“

—  Frances Wright American activist 1795 - 1852
Context: An opinion, right or wrong, can never constitute a moral offense, nor be in itself a moral obligation. It may be mistaken; it may involve an absurdity, or a contradiction. It is a truth; or it is an error: it can never be a crime or a virtue. A Few Days in Athens (1822) Vol. II

„People don't get their morality from their reading matter: they bring their morality to it.“

—  Clive James Australian author, critic, broadcaster, poet, translator and memoirist 1939
Ibid.

Alexis De Tocqueville photo

„The best laws cannot make a constitution work in spite of morals; morals can turn the worst laws to advantage.“

—  Alexis De Tocqueville French political thinker and historian 1805 - 1859
Context: The best laws cannot make a constitution work in spite of morals; morals can turn the worst laws to advantage. That is a commonplace truth, but one to which my studies are always bringing me back. It is the central point in my conception. I see it at the end of all my reflections. De la supériorité des mœurs sur les lois (1831) Oeuvres complètes, vol. VIII, p. 286 https://books.google.de/books?id=yrMFAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA286&dq=meilleures. Original text: Les meilleures lois ne peuvent faire marcher une constitution en dépit des mœurs ; les mœurs tirent parti des pires lois. C'est là une vérité commune, mais à laquelle mes études me ramènent sans cesse. Elle est placée dans mon esprit comme un point central. Je l'aperçois au bout de toutes mes idées.

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Alan Hirsch photo
Miguel de Unamuno photo

„The ascetic morality is a negative morality.“

—  Miguel de Unamuno 19th-20th century Spanish writer and philosopher 1864 - 1936
Context: The ascetic morality is a negative morality. And strictly, what is important for a man is not to die, whether he sins or not.

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Albert Einstein photo

„You are right in speaking of the moral foundations of science, but you cannot turn around and speak of the scientific foundations of morality.“

—  Albert Einstein German-born physicist and founder of the theory of relativity 1879 - 1955
Context: It has often been said, and certainly not without justification, that the man of science is a poor philosopher. Why then should it not be the right thing for the physicist to let the philosopher do the philosophizing? Such might indeed be the right thing to do at a time when the physicist believes he has at his disposal a rigid system of fundamental laws which are so well established that waves of doubt can't reach them; but it cannot be right at a time when the very foundations of physics itself have become problematic as they are now. At a time like the present, when experience forces us to seek a newer and more solid foundation, the physicist cannot simply surrender to the philosopher the critical contemplation of theoretical foundations; for he himself knows best and feels more surely where the shoe pinches. In looking for an new foundation, he must try to make clear in his own mind just how far the concepts which he uses are justified, and are necessities. "Physics and Reality" in the Journal of the Franklin Institute Vol. 221, Issue 3 (March 1936), Pages 349-382

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